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Article: Global cooling during the eocene-oligocene climate transition

TitleGlobal cooling during the eocene-oligocene climate transition
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://sciencemag.org
Citation
Science, 2009, v. 323 n. 5918, p. 1187-1190 How to Cite?
AbstractAbout 34 million years ago, Earth's climate shifted from a relatively ice-free world to one with glacial conditions on Antarctica characterized by substantial ice sheets. How Earth's temperature changed during this climate transition remains poorly understood, and evidence for Northern Hemisphere polar ice is controversial. Here, we report proxy records of sea surface temperatures from multiple ocean localities and show that the high-latitude temperature decrease was substantial and heterogeneous. High-latitude (45 degrees to 70 degrees in both hemispheres) temperatures before the climate transition were ∼20°C and cooled an average of ∼5°C. Our results, combined with ocean and ice-sheet model simulations and benthic oxygen isotope records, indicate that Northern Hemisphere glaciation was not required to accommodate the magnitude of continental ice growth during this time.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58696
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 34.661
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 13.217
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Yale Universitypostdoctoral fellowship
NSFMajor Research Instrumentation
GNS Science
Funding Information:

The authors thank S. Schouten and E. Hopmans for their assistance in establishing an interlaboratory calibration, J. Eldrett for advice on the site 913 age model, M. Woodruff of the University of Massachussetts Stable Isotope Facility for analyses of site 511 material, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program for providing samples. The reviews of P. Wilson and one anonymous referee greatly improved the manuscript. This work was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship provided by Yale University and a Major Research Instrumentation grant from NSF. Computing was performed on Rosen Center for Advanced Computing resources within Information Technology at Purdue. M.H.'s contribution is partially supported by the New Zealand's Global Change Through Time Programme at GNS Science.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPagani, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorZinniker, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorDeConto, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuber, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorBrinkhuis, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShah, SRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeckie, RMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPearson, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:35:11Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:35:11Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationScience, 2009, v. 323 n. 5918, p. 1187-1190en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58696-
dc.description.abstractAbout 34 million years ago, Earth's climate shifted from a relatively ice-free world to one with glacial conditions on Antarctica characterized by substantial ice sheets. How Earth's temperature changed during this climate transition remains poorly understood, and evidence for Northern Hemisphere polar ice is controversial. Here, we report proxy records of sea surface temperatures from multiple ocean localities and show that the high-latitude temperature decrease was substantial and heterogeneous. High-latitude (45 degrees to 70 degrees in both hemispheres) temperatures before the climate transition were ∼20°C and cooled an average of ∼5°C. Our results, combined with ocean and ice-sheet model simulations and benthic oxygen isotope records, indicate that Northern Hemisphere glaciation was not required to accommodate the magnitude of continental ice growth during this time.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://sciencemag.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofScienceen_HK
dc.rightsScience. Copyright © American Association for the Advancement of Science.en_HK
dc.titleGlobal cooling during the eocene-oligocene climate transitionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0036-8075&volume=323&spage=1187&epage=1190&date=2009&atitle=Global+cooling+during+the+Eocene-Oligocene+climate+transitionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLiu, Z:zhliu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, Z=rp00750en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.1166368en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-61349156757en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros158086en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-61349156757&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume323en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5918en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1187en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1190en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1095-9203-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263687600031-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, Z=16177844800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPagani, M=7101857920en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZinniker, D=6507274933en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeConto, R=6602434284en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuber, M=7202671706en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrinkhuis, H=7003638219en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShah, SR=13204242400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeckie, RM=7004327984en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPearson, A=7401994256en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5706637-

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