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Article: Rain-induced subsurface airflow and Lisse effect

TitleRain-induced subsurface airflow and Lisse effect
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAmerican Geophysical Union
Citation
Water Resources Research, 2008, v. 44 n. 7 How to Cite?
AbstractWater-level increase after rainfall is usually indicative of rainfall recharge to groundwater. This, however, may not be true if the Lisse effect occurs. This effect represents the water-level increase in a well driven by airflow induced by an advancing wetting front during highly intensive rains. The rainwater, which may behave like a low-permeability lid, seals the ground surface so that the air pressure beneath the wetting front is increased because of air compression due to downward movement of the wetting front. A rapid and substantial rise of the water level in the well screened below water table, which bears no relationship to groundwater recharge, can be induced when various factors such as soil properties and the rain-runoff condition combine favorably. A transient, three-dimensional and variably saturated flow model was employed to study the air and groundwater flows in the soil under rain conditions. The objectives of this paper are two-fold: to evaluate the reliability of the theory of the Lisse effect presented by Weeks to predict its magnitude in modeled situations that mimic the physical complexity of real aquifers, and to conduct parametric studies on the sensitivity of the water-level rise in the well to soil properties and the rain event. The simulation results reveal that the magnitude of the Lisse effect increases with the ponding depth. Soil permeability plays a key role in generating the Lisse effect. The water-level rise in the well is delayed relative to the air-pressure rise in the unsaturated zone when the soil permeability is low, and the maximum water-level rise is less than the maximum air pressure induced by rain infiltration. The simulation also explores the sensitivity of the Lisse effect to the van Genuchten parameters and the water table depth. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58673
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.792
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.661
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiao, JJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWeeks, EPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:34:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:34:48Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWater Resources Research, 2008, v. 44 n. 7en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0043-1397en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58673-
dc.description.abstractWater-level increase after rainfall is usually indicative of rainfall recharge to groundwater. This, however, may not be true if the Lisse effect occurs. This effect represents the water-level increase in a well driven by airflow induced by an advancing wetting front during highly intensive rains. The rainwater, which may behave like a low-permeability lid, seals the ground surface so that the air pressure beneath the wetting front is increased because of air compression due to downward movement of the wetting front. A rapid and substantial rise of the water level in the well screened below water table, which bears no relationship to groundwater recharge, can be induced when various factors such as soil properties and the rain-runoff condition combine favorably. A transient, three-dimensional and variably saturated flow model was employed to study the air and groundwater flows in the soil under rain conditions. The objectives of this paper are two-fold: to evaluate the reliability of the theory of the Lisse effect presented by Weeks to predict its magnitude in modeled situations that mimic the physical complexity of real aquifers, and to conduct parametric studies on the sensitivity of the water-level rise in the well to soil properties and the rain event. The simulation results reveal that the magnitude of the Lisse effect increases with the ponding depth. Soil permeability plays a key role in generating the Lisse effect. The water-level rise in the well is delayed relative to the air-pressure rise in the unsaturated zone when the soil permeability is low, and the maximum water-level rise is less than the maximum air pressure induced by rain infiltration. The simulation also explores the sensitivity of the Lisse effect to the van Genuchten parameters and the water table depth. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWater Resources Researchen_HK
dc.rightsWATER RESOURCES RESEARCH . Copyright © American Geophysical Union.en_HK
dc.titleRain-induced subsurface airflow and Lisse effecten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0043-1397&volume=44 &issue=7&spage=1&epage=9&date=2008&atitle=Rain-induced+subsurface+airflow+and+Lisse+effecten_HK
dc.identifier.emailJiao, JJ:jjiao@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJiao, JJ=rp00712en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2007WR006294en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-53649110901en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros153040en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-53649110901&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume44en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257803700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuo, H=25226459100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiao, JJ=7102382963en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeeks, EP=7003497793en_HK

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