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Article: Bacterial community composition in thermophilic microbial mats from five hot springs in central Tibet

TitleBacterial community composition in thermophilic microbial mats from five hot springs in central Tibet
Authors
KeywordsChlorobi
Chloroflexi
Hot Springs
Proteobacteria
Synechococcus
Thermophiles
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer Japan. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00792/index.htm
Citation
Extremophiles, 2009, v. 13 n. 1, p. 139-149 How to Cite?
AbstractDespite detailed study of selected thermophilic taxa, overall community diversity of bacteria in thermophilic mats remains relatively poorly understood. A sequence-based survey of bacterial communities from several hot spring locations in central Tibet was undertaken. Diversity and frequency of occurrence for 140 unique 16S rRNA gene phylotypes were identified in clone libraries constructed from environmental samples. A lineage-per-time plot revealed that individual locations have evolved to support relatively large numbers of phylogenetically closely related phylotypes. Application of the F ST statistic and P test to community data was used to demonstrate that phylogenetic divergence between locations was significant, thus emphasizing the status of hot springs as isolated habitats. Among phylotypes, only the Chlorobi were ubiquitous to all mats, other phototrophs (Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi) occurred in most but not all samples and generally accounted for a large number of recovered phylotypes. Phylogenetic analyses of phototrophic phylotypes revealed support for location-specific lineages. The alpha, beta and gamma proteobacteria were also frequently recovered phyla, suggesting they may be abundant phylotypes in mats, a hitherto unappreciated aspect of thermophilic mat biodiversity. Samples from one location indicated that where phototrophic bacteria were rare or absent due to niche disturbance, the relative frequency of proteobacterial phylotypes increased. © 2008 Springer.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58660
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.346
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.972
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong KongHKU 7573/05M
Stephen S. F. Hui Trust Fund
Funding Information:

The authors are grateful to the Tibet Ministry of Geology for fieldwork assistance. This research was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (grant number HKU 7573/05M), and the Stephen S. F. Hui Trust Fund.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, MCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAitchison, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:34:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:34:34Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationExtremophiles, 2009, v. 13 n. 1, p. 139-149en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1431-0651en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58660-
dc.description.abstractDespite detailed study of selected thermophilic taxa, overall community diversity of bacteria in thermophilic mats remains relatively poorly understood. A sequence-based survey of bacterial communities from several hot spring locations in central Tibet was undertaken. Diversity and frequency of occurrence for 140 unique 16S rRNA gene phylotypes were identified in clone libraries constructed from environmental samples. A lineage-per-time plot revealed that individual locations have evolved to support relatively large numbers of phylogenetically closely related phylotypes. Application of the F ST statistic and P test to community data was used to demonstrate that phylogenetic divergence between locations was significant, thus emphasizing the status of hot springs as isolated habitats. Among phylotypes, only the Chlorobi were ubiquitous to all mats, other phototrophs (Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi) occurred in most but not all samples and generally accounted for a large number of recovered phylotypes. Phylogenetic analyses of phototrophic phylotypes revealed support for location-specific lineages. The alpha, beta and gamma proteobacteria were also frequently recovered phyla, suggesting they may be abundant phylotypes in mats, a hitherto unappreciated aspect of thermophilic mat biodiversity. Samples from one location indicated that where phototrophic bacteria were rare or absent due to niche disturbance, the relative frequency of proteobacterial phylotypes increased. © 2008 Springer.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Japan. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00792/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofExtremophilesen_HK
dc.subjectChlorobien_HK
dc.subjectChloroflexien_HK
dc.subjectHot Springsen_HK
dc.subjectProteobacteriaen_HK
dc.subjectSynechococcusen_HK
dc.subjectThermophilesen_HK
dc.titleBacterial community composition in thermophilic microbial mats from five hot springs in central Tibeten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, MCY: maglau@princeton.eduen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAitchison, JC: jona@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, MCY=rp00721en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAitchison, JC=rp00658en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00792-008-0205-3en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19023516-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58149204132en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros155417en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58149204132&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage139en_HK
dc.identifier.epage149en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000261986300015-
dc.publisher.placeJapanen_HK
dc.relation.projectMolecular diversity and phylogeography of thermophilic communities within geothermal springs in southeast Asia and the contribution of adaptation and allopatry to diversity-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, MCY=35177794300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAitchison, JC=7102533858en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3701107-

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