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Article: Peptide synthesis in early earth hydrothermal systems

TitlePeptide synthesis in early earth hydrothermal systems
Authors
KeywordsCondensation
Gibbs energy
Hydrolysis
Hydrothermal
Origin of life
Peptide
Issue Date2009
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/ast
Citation
Astrobiology, 2009, v. 9 n. 2, p. 141-146 How to Cite?
AbstractWe report here results from experiments and thermodynamic calculations that demonstrate a rapid, temperature-enhanced synthesis of oligopeptides from the condensation of aqueous glycine. Experiments were conducted in custom-made hydrothermal reactors, and organic compounds were characterized with ultraviolet-visible procedures. A comparison of peptide yields at 260°C with those obtained at more moderate temperatures (160°C) gives evidence of a significant (13 kJ · mol-1) exergonic shift. In contrast to previous hydrothermal studies, we demonstrate that peptide synthesis is favored in hydrothermal fluids and that rates of peptide hydrolysis are controlled by the stability of the parent amino acid, with a critical dependence on reactor surface composition. From our study, we predict that rapid recycling of product peptides from cool into near-supercritical fluids in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems will enhance peptide chain elongation. It is anticipated that the abundant hydrothermal systems on early Earth could have provided a substantial source of biomolecules required for the origin of life. Astrobiology 9, 141-146. © 2009 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2009.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58652
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.628
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.836
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
USGS Hydrothermal Laboratory in Menlo Park, CA
NASA Astrobiology Institute grantNCC2-1056
McGee and Shell funds at Stanford University
Funding Information:

The authors want to thank Everett Shock, Keith Kvenvolden, Kevin Hand, and Christopher Oze for valuable discussions about hydrothermal organic synthesis. We also wish to thank David Ross for fruitful discussions on originsof- life chemistry. Three anonymous reviewers and Editor S. Cady are thanked for their constructive comments on the manuscript. This work was carried out at the USGS Hydrothermal Laboratory in Menlo Park, CA, and funded by a NASA Astrobiology Institute grant (NCC2-1056) and by grants from the McGee and Shell funds at Stanford University awarded to K. H. Lemke.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLemke, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRosenbauer, RJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBird, DKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:34:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:34:25Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAstrobiology, 2009, v. 9 n. 2, p. 141-146en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1531-1074en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58652-
dc.description.abstractWe report here results from experiments and thermodynamic calculations that demonstrate a rapid, temperature-enhanced synthesis of oligopeptides from the condensation of aqueous glycine. Experiments were conducted in custom-made hydrothermal reactors, and organic compounds were characterized with ultraviolet-visible procedures. A comparison of peptide yields at 260°C with those obtained at more moderate temperatures (160°C) gives evidence of a significant (13 kJ · mol-1) exergonic shift. In contrast to previous hydrothermal studies, we demonstrate that peptide synthesis is favored in hydrothermal fluids and that rates of peptide hydrolysis are controlled by the stability of the parent amino acid, with a critical dependence on reactor surface composition. From our study, we predict that rapid recycling of product peptides from cool into near-supercritical fluids in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems will enhance peptide chain elongation. It is anticipated that the abundant hydrothermal systems on early Earth could have provided a substantial source of biomolecules required for the origin of life. Astrobiology 9, 141-146. © 2009 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2009.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/asten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAstrobiologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThis is a copy of an article published in the Astrobiology © 2009 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.; Astrobiology is available online at: http://www.liebertonline.com.-
dc.subjectCondensationen_HK
dc.subjectGibbs energyen_HK
dc.subjectHydrolysisen_HK
dc.subjectHydrothermalen_HK
dc.subjectOrigin of lifeen_HK
dc.subjectPeptideen_HK
dc.subject.meshBiogenesis-
dc.subject.meshEvolution, Chemical-
dc.subject.meshPeptide Biosynthesis-
dc.subject.meshSeawater - chemistry-
dc.subject.meshThermodynamics-
dc.titlePeptide synthesis in early earth hydrothermal systemsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1531-1074&volume=9&issue=2&spage=141&epage=146&date=2009&atitle=Peptide+synthesis+in+early+earth+hydrothermal+systemsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLemke, KH:kono@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLemke, KH=rp00729en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/ast.2008.0166en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19371157-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65249145113en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros162013en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-65249145113&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume9en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage141en_HK
dc.identifier.epage146en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1557-8070-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000265707200001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLemke, KH=24168776600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRosenbauer, RJ=7003888851en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBird, DK=7201990536en_HK

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