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Article: Interpretation of torsional shear results for nonlinear stress-strain relationship

TitleInterpretation of torsional shear results for nonlinear stress-strain relationship
Authors
KeywordsDifferentiation of discrete data
Digital signal processing
Stress-strain curve
Torque-twist curve
Torsion
Issue Date2008
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/3312
Citation
International Journal For Numerical And Analytical Methods In Geomechanics, 2008, v. 32 n. 10, p. 1247-1266 How to Cite?
AbstractTorsional tests are frequently used in material testing to determine shear stress-strain relationships. In the tests, torque is applied to a solid or hollow cylindrical specimen, whose twist angle is recorded as the response. While the raw test results are readily available in terms of torque-twist sets, converting them into intrinsic stress-strain relationships is not always straightforward, owing to the nonlinear stress-strain behavior and the non-uniform radial distribution of the stress and strain fields. It follows that the approaches currently used to interpret torsional data are essentially empirical based. The present paper addresses this data interpretation issue from a more rigorous perspective. The paper includes two parts: the first part concerns hollow cylindrical specimens under torsion, where an analytical-based recursive procedure is developed; and the second part deals with solid torsional specimens, for which an analytical solution given by Nadai is directly employed. Examples pertaining to these two cases are examined and the resulting shear stress-strain curves are compared with those based on a number of popular empirical methods. The proposed analytical approaches can serve as a benchmark for checking the accuracy and validity of those empirical propositions. It is worth noting that, for brittle materials exhibiting softening behavior, only the analytical method gives the correct interpretation. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58553
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.758
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.676
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, ZXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, XSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:32:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:32:25Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal For Numerical And Analytical Methods In Geomechanics, 2008, v. 32 n. 10, p. 1247-1266en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0363-9061en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58553-
dc.description.abstractTorsional tests are frequently used in material testing to determine shear stress-strain relationships. In the tests, torque is applied to a solid or hollow cylindrical specimen, whose twist angle is recorded as the response. While the raw test results are readily available in terms of torque-twist sets, converting them into intrinsic stress-strain relationships is not always straightforward, owing to the nonlinear stress-strain behavior and the non-uniform radial distribution of the stress and strain fields. It follows that the approaches currently used to interpret torsional data are essentially empirical based. The present paper addresses this data interpretation issue from a more rigorous perspective. The paper includes two parts: the first part concerns hollow cylindrical specimens under torsion, where an analytical-based recursive procedure is developed; and the second part deals with solid torsional specimens, for which an analytical solution given by Nadai is directly employed. Examples pertaining to these two cases are examined and the resulting shear stress-strain curves are compared with those based on a number of popular empirical methods. The proposed analytical approaches can serve as a benchmark for checking the accuracy and validity of those empirical propositions. It is worth noting that, for brittle materials exhibiting softening behavior, only the analytical method gives the correct interpretation. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/3312en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanicsen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectDifferentiation of discrete dataen_HK
dc.subjectDigital signal processingen_HK
dc.subjectStress-strain curveen_HK
dc.subjectTorque-twist curveen_HK
dc.subjectTorsionen_HK
dc.titleInterpretation of torsional shear results for nonlinear stress-strain relationshipen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0363-9061&volume=32&spage=1247&epage=1266&date=2008&atitle=Interpretation+of+torsional+shear+results+for+nonlinear+stress-strain+relationshipen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYang, J:junyang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYang, J=rp00201en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/nag.669en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-48449090223en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros148486en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-48449090223&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume32en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1247en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1266en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258017100005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, ZX=15768305100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, XS=25823194900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, J=35605258800en_HK

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