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Article: Hydraulics of tangential vortex intake for urban drainage

TitleHydraulics of tangential vortex intake for urban drainage
Authors
KeywordsDrainage
Drop structures
Hydraulic jump
Shafts
Stormwater management
Urban areas
Vortices
Issue Date2009
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.asce.org/journals/hy.html
Citation
Journal Of Hydraulic Engineering, 2009, v. 135 n. 3, p. 164-174 How to Cite?
AbstractA tangential vortex intake is a compact structure that can convey storm water efficiently as a swirling flow down a vortex dropshaft. It has been studied in physical models and successfully employed in urban drainage and hydroelectric plant applications, but a comprehensive account of the key flow characteristics has not been reported and a theoretical design guideline of a tangential intake is not available. In this study the hydraulics of tangential slot vortex intakes is investigated via extensive experiments. It is found that the flow in the tapering and downward sloping vortex inlet channel is strongly dependent on the geometry of the inlet and dropshaft. Under some conditions, hydraulic instability and overflow can occur, rendering the design ineffective. It is shown that the hydraulic stability depends on the discharge at which flow control shifts from upstream to downstream (Qc), as well as the free drainage discharge (Qf). A theoretical design criterion for stable flow is developed in terms of Qf and Qc as a function of the vortex inlet geometry. For a "stable" design, the flow in the tapering inlet evolves from supercritical flow to subcritical flow smoothly as the discharge increases. Fifteen different tangential vortex intake models are tested. The experimental observations are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction. The present study provides a general guideline for designing a tangential vortex intake that can convey the flow smoothly without unstable fluctuating flow associated with a hydraulic jump. © 2009 ASCE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58547
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.284
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.908
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, JHWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:32:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:32:19Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Hydraulic Engineering, 2009, v. 135 n. 3, p. 164-174en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0733-9429en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58547-
dc.description.abstractA tangential vortex intake is a compact structure that can convey storm water efficiently as a swirling flow down a vortex dropshaft. It has been studied in physical models and successfully employed in urban drainage and hydroelectric plant applications, but a comprehensive account of the key flow characteristics has not been reported and a theoretical design guideline of a tangential intake is not available. In this study the hydraulics of tangential slot vortex intakes is investigated via extensive experiments. It is found that the flow in the tapering and downward sloping vortex inlet channel is strongly dependent on the geometry of the inlet and dropshaft. Under some conditions, hydraulic instability and overflow can occur, rendering the design ineffective. It is shown that the hydraulic stability depends on the discharge at which flow control shifts from upstream to downstream (Qc), as well as the free drainage discharge (Qf). A theoretical design criterion for stable flow is developed in terms of Qf and Qc as a function of the vortex inlet geometry. For a "stable" design, the flow in the tapering inlet evolves from supercritical flow to subcritical flow smoothly as the discharge increases. Fifteen different tangential vortex intake models are tested. The experimental observations are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction. The present study provides a general guideline for designing a tangential vortex intake that can convey the flow smoothly without unstable fluctuating flow associated with a hydraulic jump. © 2009 ASCE.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.asce.org/journals/hy.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Hydraulic Engineeringen_HK
dc.subjectDrainageen_HK
dc.subjectDrop structuresen_HK
dc.subjectHydraulic jumpen_HK
dc.subjectShaftsen_HK
dc.subjectStormwater managementen_HK
dc.subjectUrban areasen_HK
dc.subjectVorticesen_HK
dc.titleHydraulics of tangential vortex intake for urban drainageen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, JHW: hreclhw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, JHW=rp00061en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(2009)135:3(164)en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-60649084221en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154917en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-60649084221&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume135en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage164en_HK
dc.identifier.epage174en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263403000002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, D=55481575200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, JHW=36078318900en_HK

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