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Article: Visualisation and characterisation of biopolymer clusters in a submerged membrane bioreactor

TitleVisualisation and characterisation of biopolymer clusters in a submerged membrane bioreactor
Authors
KeywordsBiological wastewater treatment
Biopolymer cluster (BPC)
Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)
Membrane bioreactor (MBR)
Membrane fouling
Issue Date2008
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/memsci
Citation
Journal Of Membrane Science, 2008, v. 325 n. 2, p. 691-697 How to Cite?
AbstractA laboratory wastewater treatment membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a submerged hollow-fibre membrane was used to investigate the major foulants in sludge mixtures. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with a triple fluorescent staining protocol, i.e., SYTO9 for microbial cells, ConA-TRITC lectin for polysaccharides and NanoOrange for proteins, was utilised to visualise the fouling materials. A pool of biopolymer clusters (BPCs) ranging from 2.5 to 60 μm in size was identified in the liquid phase of the MBR sludge and in the cake sludge on the membrane surface. According to the CLSM examination, BPC are free and independent organic solutes that are different from biomass flocs and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and much larger than soluble microbial products (SMP). Compared to EPS, BPC contain more polysaccharides and proteins and less humic substances. It is believed that BPC are an important foulant that interacts with biomass flocs to form the sludge fouling layer on the membrane. A filtration test observed with the CLSM shows that BPC are apparently formed by the adsorption and affinity clustering of SMP within the sludge deposited on the membrane surface. The cake sludge on the fouled membrane has a much higher BPC content (16.8 mg TOC/g SS) than the MBR bulk sludge (0.4 mg TOC/g SS). It is argued that BPC behave as a glue to facilitate the growth of an impermeable sludge cake on the membrane surface, thus resulting in serious MBR fouling. These CLSM findings provide the first direct evidence of the presence of BPC in MBR and illustrate their essential role in membrane fouling. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58494
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.557
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.042
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council (RGC)N-HKU737/04
HKU7144/E07
Hong Kong SAR Government
Outstanding Young Researcher Award
The University of Hong Kong, China
Funding Information:

This research was supported by grants N-HKU737/04 and HKU7144/E07 from the Research Grants Council (RGC) of the Hong Kong SAR Government and funding from the Outstanding Young Researcher Award of The University of Hong Kong, China. The instruction of Dr. T. Zhang on CLSM procedures and the technical assistance of Mr. Keith C.H. Wong are greatly appreciated.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, FYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, XMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, XYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:31:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:31:25Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Membrane Science, 2008, v. 325 n. 2, p. 691-697en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0376-7388en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58494-
dc.description.abstractA laboratory wastewater treatment membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a submerged hollow-fibre membrane was used to investigate the major foulants in sludge mixtures. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with a triple fluorescent staining protocol, i.e., SYTO9 for microbial cells, ConA-TRITC lectin for polysaccharides and NanoOrange for proteins, was utilised to visualise the fouling materials. A pool of biopolymer clusters (BPCs) ranging from 2.5 to 60 μm in size was identified in the liquid phase of the MBR sludge and in the cake sludge on the membrane surface. According to the CLSM examination, BPC are free and independent organic solutes that are different from biomass flocs and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and much larger than soluble microbial products (SMP). Compared to EPS, BPC contain more polysaccharides and proteins and less humic substances. It is believed that BPC are an important foulant that interacts with biomass flocs to form the sludge fouling layer on the membrane. A filtration test observed with the CLSM shows that BPC are apparently formed by the adsorption and affinity clustering of SMP within the sludge deposited on the membrane surface. The cake sludge on the fouled membrane has a much higher BPC content (16.8 mg TOC/g SS) than the MBR bulk sludge (0.4 mg TOC/g SS). It is argued that BPC behave as a glue to facilitate the growth of an impermeable sludge cake on the membrane surface, thus resulting in serious MBR fouling. These CLSM findings provide the first direct evidence of the presence of BPC in MBR and illustrate their essential role in membrane fouling. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/memscien_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Membrane Scienceen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBiological wastewater treatmenten_HK
dc.subjectBiopolymer cluster (BPC)en_HK
dc.subjectConfocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)en_HK
dc.subjectMembrane bioreactor (MBR)en_HK
dc.subjectMembrane foulingen_HK
dc.titleVisualisation and characterisation of biopolymer clusters in a submerged membrane bioreactoren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0376-7388&volume=325&issue=2&spage=691&epage=697&date=2008&atitle=Visualisation+and+characterisation+of+biopolymer+clusters+in+a+submerged+membrane+bioreactoren_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, XM: wangxm@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, XY: xlia@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, XM=rp01452en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, XY=rp00222en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.memsci.2008.08.048en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-55549138713en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros164539en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-55549138713&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume325en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage691en_HK
dc.identifier.epage697en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262946800024-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, FY=16064782300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, XM=23092524200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, XY=26642887900en_HK

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