File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Microbial population dynamics during aerobic sludge granulation at different organic loading rates

TitleMicrobial population dynamics during aerobic sludge granulation at different organic loading rates
Authors
KeywordsAerobic granulation
Biological wastewater treatment
Microbial community
PCR-DGGE
Sequencing batch reactor (SBR)
Issue Date2008
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/watres
Citation
Water Research, 2008, v. 42 n. 13, p. 3552-3560 How to Cite?
AbstractLaboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the evolution of the bacterial community during aerobic sludge granulation. The experiments were conducted in three 2.4 L sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) that were seeded with activated sludge and fed with glucose-based synthetic wastewater. Three different influent organic concentrations were introduced into the three SBRs, R1, R2 and R3, resulting in chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rates of 1.5 (R1), 3.0 (R2) and 4.5 (R3) kg/m3 d, respectively. Changes in bacterial diversity throughout the granulation process were monitored and analysed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques. The experimental results demonstrate that glucose-fed aerobic granules could be formed without significant presence of filamentous bacteria. Granules formed at different loading rates had different morphology, structural properties and bacterial species. A higher loading rate resulted in faster formation of larger and loose granules, while a lower loading rate resulted in slower formation of smaller and more tightly packed granules. The biomass underwent a dynamic transformation in terms of bacterial species richness and dominance during the granulation process. The reactor with the highest substrate loading rate had the lowest species diversity, while the reactor with the lowest substrate loading rate had the highest species diversity. Different dominant species of β- and γ-Proteobacteria and Flavobacterium within the granule communities from the three different SBRs were confirmed by analysis of 16S rDNA sequences of the PCR products separated by DGGE. It is apparent that a few common bacterial species play an important role in the formation and growth of aerobic granules and help sustain the granular sludge structure in the bioreactors. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58482
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.991
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.772
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, SFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, XYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:31:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:31:13Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWater Research, 2008, v. 42 n. 13, p. 3552-3560en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0043-1354en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58482-
dc.description.abstractLaboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the evolution of the bacterial community during aerobic sludge granulation. The experiments were conducted in three 2.4 L sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) that were seeded with activated sludge and fed with glucose-based synthetic wastewater. Three different influent organic concentrations were introduced into the three SBRs, R1, R2 and R3, resulting in chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rates of 1.5 (R1), 3.0 (R2) and 4.5 (R3) kg/m3 d, respectively. Changes in bacterial diversity throughout the granulation process were monitored and analysed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques. The experimental results demonstrate that glucose-fed aerobic granules could be formed without significant presence of filamentous bacteria. Granules formed at different loading rates had different morphology, structural properties and bacterial species. A higher loading rate resulted in faster formation of larger and loose granules, while a lower loading rate resulted in slower formation of smaller and more tightly packed granules. The biomass underwent a dynamic transformation in terms of bacterial species richness and dominance during the granulation process. The reactor with the highest substrate loading rate had the lowest species diversity, while the reactor with the lowest substrate loading rate had the highest species diversity. Different dominant species of β- and γ-Proteobacteria and Flavobacterium within the granule communities from the three different SBRs were confirmed by analysis of 16S rDNA sequences of the PCR products separated by DGGE. It is apparent that a few common bacterial species play an important role in the formation and growth of aerobic granules and help sustain the granular sludge structure in the bioreactors. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/watresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWater Researchen_HK
dc.subjectAerobic granulationen_HK
dc.subjectBiological wastewater treatmenten_HK
dc.subjectMicrobial communityen_HK
dc.subjectPCR-DGGEen_HK
dc.subjectSequencing batch reactor (SBR)en_HK
dc.subject.meshAerobiosisen_HK
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanningen_HK
dc.subject.meshSewage - microbiologyen_HK
dc.titleMicrobial population dynamics during aerobic sludge granulation at different organic loading ratesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0043-1354&volume=42&spage=3552&epage=3560&date=2008&atitle=Microbial+population+dynamics+during+aerobic+sludge+granulation+at+different+organic+loading+ratesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, XY: xlia@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, XY=rp00222en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2008.05.005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18541284-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-54049127335en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros149610en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-54049127335&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume42en_HK
dc.identifier.issue13en_HK
dc.identifier.spage3552en_HK
dc.identifier.epage3560en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257982400031-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, AJ=24338209600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, SF=7406949577en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, XY=26642887900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2917026-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats