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Article: Promotion of central nervous system remyelination by induced differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells
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TitlePromotion of central nervous system remyelination by induced differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells
 
AuthorsMi, S5
Miller, RH1
Tang, W5
Lee, X5
Hu, B4
Wu, W4
Zhang, Y6
Shields, CB6
Zhang, Y6
Miklasz, S5
Shea, D5
Mason, J2
Franklin, RJM7
Ji, B5
Shao, Z5
Chédotal, A3
Bernard, F3
Roulois, A7
Xu, J5
Jung, V5
Pepinsky, B5
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/76507645
 
CitationAnnals Of Neurology, 2009, v. 65 n. 3, p. 304-315 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.21581
 
AbstractObjective: Repair of demyelinated axons in diseases such as multiple sclerosis requires activation of the myelination program in existing or newly recruited oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). The control of OPC differentiation and initiation of myelination during repair is poorly understood. In this study, we test the ability of anti-LINGO-1 reagents to promote myelination in vitro and remyelination in the rodent adult central nervous system in vivo. Methods: The effects of LINGO-1 antagonists on the differentiation of OPCs and the promotion of myelination has been assayed using a combination of coculture and slice culture preparations. Using three different animal models of demyelination and remyelination, we morphologically and functionally assessed the effects of LINGO-1 antagonists on OPC differentiation and myelin repair. Results: The data indicate that in vitro treatment with antagonists of LINGO-1 promote OPC differentiation and myelination, whereas in vivo remyelination is accelerated in lysophosphatidylcholine- or cuprizone-induced demyelination. This remyelination is associated with enhanced OPC differentiation and functional recovery of conduction velocities in demyelinated axons. Interpretation: Our studies demonstrate that LINGO-1 antagonism promotes OPC differentiation and remyelination, and suggest LINGO-1 functions as an inhibitor of OPC differentiation to retard central nervous system remyelination. © 2009 American Neurological Association.
 
ISSN0364-5134
2013 Impact Factor: 11.910
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.21581
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000264779600012
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMi, S
 
dc.contributor.authorMiller, RH
 
dc.contributor.authorTang, W
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, X
 
dc.contributor.authorHu, B
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, W
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorShields, CB
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorMiklasz, S
 
dc.contributor.authorShea, D
 
dc.contributor.authorMason, J
 
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, RJM
 
dc.contributor.authorJi, B
 
dc.contributor.authorShao, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorChédotal, A
 
dc.contributor.authorBernard, F
 
dc.contributor.authorRoulois, A
 
dc.contributor.authorXu, J
 
dc.contributor.authorJung, V
 
dc.contributor.authorPepinsky, B
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:26:25Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:26:25Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: Repair of demyelinated axons in diseases such as multiple sclerosis requires activation of the myelination program in existing or newly recruited oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). The control of OPC differentiation and initiation of myelination during repair is poorly understood. In this study, we test the ability of anti-LINGO-1 reagents to promote myelination in vitro and remyelination in the rodent adult central nervous system in vivo. Methods: The effects of LINGO-1 antagonists on the differentiation of OPCs and the promotion of myelination has been assayed using a combination of coculture and slice culture preparations. Using three different animal models of demyelination and remyelination, we morphologically and functionally assessed the effects of LINGO-1 antagonists on OPC differentiation and myelin repair. Results: The data indicate that in vitro treatment with antagonists of LINGO-1 promote OPC differentiation and myelination, whereas in vivo remyelination is accelerated in lysophosphatidylcholine- or cuprizone-induced demyelination. This remyelination is associated with enhanced OPC differentiation and functional recovery of conduction velocities in demyelinated axons. Interpretation: Our studies demonstrate that LINGO-1 antagonism promotes OPC differentiation and remyelination, and suggest LINGO-1 functions as an inhibitor of OPC differentiation to retard central nervous system remyelination. © 2009 American Neurological Association.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Neurology, 2009, v. 65 n. 3, p. 304-315 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.21581
 
dc.identifier.citeulike6901042
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.21581
 
dc.identifier.eissn1531-8249
 
dc.identifier.epage315
 
dc.identifier.hkuros163976
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000264779600012
 
dc.identifier.issn0364-5134
2013 Impact Factor: 11.910
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19334062
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65249142739
 
dc.identifier.spage304
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58239
 
dc.identifier.volume65
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/76507645
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Neurology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsAnnals of Neurology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Newborn
 
dc.subject.meshAntibodies - pharmacology - therapeutic use
 
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiation - drug effects - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultured
 
dc.subject.meshCuprizone - toxicity
 
dc.subject.meshDemyelinating Autoimmune Diseases, CNS - chemically induced - drug therapy - pathology - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animal
 
dc.subject.meshGanglia, Spinal - cytology
 
dc.subject.meshLysophosphatidylcholines - toxicity
 
dc.subject.meshMembrane Proteins - antagonists & inhibitors - immunology - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshMice
 
dc.subject.meshMyelin Proteins - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshMyelin Sheath - drug effects - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshNerve Tissue Proteins - antagonists & inhibitors - immunology - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshOligodendroglia - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshOrgan Culture Techniques
 
dc.subject.meshRats
 
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawley
 
dc.subject.meshStem Cells - drug effects - physiology
 
dc.titlePromotion of central nervous system remyelination by induced differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Objective: Repair of demyelinated axons in diseases such as multiple sclerosis requires activation of the myelination program in existing or newly recruited oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). The control of OPC differentiation and initiation of myelination during repair is poorly understood. In this study, we test the ability of anti-LINGO-1 reagents to promote myelination in vitro and remyelination in the rodent adult central nervous system in vivo. Methods: The effects of LINGO-1 antagonists on the differentiation of OPCs and the promotion of myelination has been assayed using a combination of coculture and slice culture preparations. Using three different animal models of demyelination and remyelination, we morphologically and functionally assessed the effects of LINGO-1 antagonists on OPC differentiation and myelin repair. Results: The data indicate that in vitro treatment with antagonists of LINGO-1 promote OPC differentiation and myelination, whereas in vivo remyelination is accelerated in lysophosphatidylcholine- or cuprizone-induced demyelination. This remyelination is associated with enhanced OPC differentiation and functional recovery of conduction velocities in demyelinated axons. Interpretation: Our studies demonstrate that LINGO-1 antagonism promotes OPC differentiation and remyelination, and suggest LINGO-1 functions as an inhibitor of OPC differentiation to retard central nervous system remyelination. &#169; 2009 American Neurological Association.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. School of Medicine
  2. University of Thomas Jefferson
  3. Universite Pierre et Marie Curie
  4. The University of Hong Kong
  5. Biogen IDEC
  6. null
  7. University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine