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Article: Implantation of neurotrophic factor-treated sensory nerve graft enhances survival and axonal regeneration of motoneurons after spinal root avulsion
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TitleImplantation of neurotrophic factor-treated sensory nerve graft enhances survival and axonal regeneration of motoneurons after spinal root avulsion
 
AuthorsChu, TH1
Li, SY2
Guo, A1
Wong, WM1
Yuan, Q1
Wu, W1 2 1
 
KeywordsAvulsion
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor
Ciliary neurotrophic factor
Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor
Peripheral nerve graft
Pleiotrophin
Regeneration
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jneuropath.com
 
CitationJournal Of Neuropathology And Experimental Neurology, 2009, v. 68 n. 1, p. 94-101 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NEN.0b013e31819344a9
 
AbstractWe previously showed that motor nerves are superior to sensory nerves in promoting axon regeneration after spinal root avulsion. It is, however, impractical to use motor nerves as grafts. One potential approach to enhancing axonal regeneration using sensory nerves is to deliver trophic factors to the graft. Here, we examined the regulation of receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and pleiotrophin after root avulsion in adult rats. We then tested their survival-promoting and neuroregenerative effects on spinal motoneurons. The results showed that receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were upregulated and that these trophic factors promoted survival and axonal regeneration of motoneurons when they were injected into the sensory nerve graft before implantation. In contrast, receptors for ciliary neurotrophic factor and pleiotrophin were downregulated after avulsion. Ciliary neurotrophic factor did not promote survival and axonal regeneration, whereas pleiotrophin promoted axonal regeneration but not survival of injured spinal motoneurons. Our results suggest that infusion of trophic factors into sensory nerve grafts promote motoneuron survival and axonal regeneration. The technique is technically easy and is, therefore, potentially clinically applicable. © 2008 by the American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc.
 
ISSN0022-3069
2012 Impact Factor: 4.345
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.852
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NEN.0b013e31819344a9
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChu, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorGuo, A
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, W
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:26:04Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:26:04Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractWe previously showed that motor nerves are superior to sensory nerves in promoting axon regeneration after spinal root avulsion. It is, however, impractical to use motor nerves as grafts. One potential approach to enhancing axonal regeneration using sensory nerves is to deliver trophic factors to the graft. Here, we examined the regulation of receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and pleiotrophin after root avulsion in adult rats. We then tested their survival-promoting and neuroregenerative effects on spinal motoneurons. The results showed that receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were upregulated and that these trophic factors promoted survival and axonal regeneration of motoneurons when they were injected into the sensory nerve graft before implantation. In contrast, receptors for ciliary neurotrophic factor and pleiotrophin were downregulated after avulsion. Ciliary neurotrophic factor did not promote survival and axonal regeneration, whereas pleiotrophin promoted axonal regeneration but not survival of injured spinal motoneurons. Our results suggest that infusion of trophic factors into sensory nerve grafts promote motoneuron survival and axonal regeneration. The technique is technically easy and is, therefore, potentially clinically applicable. © 2008 by the American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Neuropathology And Experimental Neurology, 2009, v. 68 n. 1, p. 94-101 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NEN.0b013e31819344a9
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NEN.0b013e31819344a9
 
dc.identifier.epage101
 
dc.identifier.hkuros154469
 
dc.identifier.issn0022-3069
2012 Impact Factor: 4.345
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.852
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-64049090493
 
dc.identifier.spage94
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58220
 
dc.identifier.volume68
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jneuropath.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectAvulsion
 
dc.subjectBrain-derived neurotrophic factor
 
dc.subjectCiliary neurotrophic factor
 
dc.subjectGlial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor
 
dc.subjectPeripheral nerve graft
 
dc.subjectPleiotrophin
 
dc.subjectRegeneration
 
dc.titleImplantation of neurotrophic factor-treated sensory nerve graft enhances survival and axonal regeneration of motoneurons after spinal root avulsion
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. The University of Hong Kong