File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold promotes the reconstruction of acutely injured brain
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleSelf-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold promotes the reconstruction of acutely injured brain
 
AuthorsGuo, J1 2
Leung, KKG1
Su, H1
Yuan, Q1
Wang, L1
Chu, TH1
Zhang, W1
Pu, JKS1
Ng, GKP1
Wong, WM1
Dai, X2
Wu, W1
 
KeywordsInflammation
Reconstruction
Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold
Traumatic brain injury
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nanomed
 
CitationNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, And Medicine, 2009, v. 5 n. 3, p. 345-351 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nano.2008.12.001
 
AbstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) or brain surgery may cause extensive loss of cerebral parenchyma. However, no strategy for reconstruction has been clinically effective. Our previous study had shown that self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) can bridge the injured spinal cord, elicit axon regeneration, and eventually promote locomotor functional recovery. In the present study we investigated the effect of SAPNS for the reconstruction of acutely injured brain. The lesion cavity of the injured cortex was filled with SAPNS or saline immediately after surgically induced TBI, and the rats were killed 2 days, 2 weeks, or 6 weeks after the surgery for histology, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL studies. Saline treatment in the control animals resulted in a large cavity in the injured brain, whereas no cavity of any significant size was found in the SAPNS-treated animals. Around the lesion site in control animals were many macrophages (ED1 positive) but few TUNEL-positive cells, indicating that the TBI caused secondary tissue loss mainly by means of necrosis, not apoptosis. In the SAPNS-treated animals the graft of SAPNS integrated well with the host tissue with no obvious gaps. Moreover, there were fewer astrocytes (GFAP positive) and macrophages (ED1 positive) around the lesion site in the SAPNS-treated animals than were found in the controls. Thus, SAPNS may help to reconstruct the acutely injured brain and reduce the glial reaction and inflammation in the surrounding brain tissue. From the Clinical Editor: Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) was reported earlier to bridge the injured spinal cord, elicit axon regeneration, and promote locomotor recovery. In this study the effect of SAPNS for the reconstruction of acutely injured brain was investigated. In SAPNS-treated animals the graft integrated well with the host tissue with no obvious gaps. SAPNS may help to reconstruct the acutely injured brain and reduced the glial reaction and inflammation in the surrounding brain tissue. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN1549-9634
2013 Impact Factor: 5.978
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nano.2008.12.001
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000270570000010
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong Research Grants Council
Funding Information:

Financial support was provided by the University of Hong Kong and Hong Kong Research Grants Council.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorGuo, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KKG
 
dc.contributor.authorSu, H
 
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, L
 
dc.contributor.authorChu, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, W
 
dc.contributor.authorPu, JKS
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, GKP
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorDai, X
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, W
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:25:40Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:25:40Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) or brain surgery may cause extensive loss of cerebral parenchyma. However, no strategy for reconstruction has been clinically effective. Our previous study had shown that self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) can bridge the injured spinal cord, elicit axon regeneration, and eventually promote locomotor functional recovery. In the present study we investigated the effect of SAPNS for the reconstruction of acutely injured brain. The lesion cavity of the injured cortex was filled with SAPNS or saline immediately after surgically induced TBI, and the rats were killed 2 days, 2 weeks, or 6 weeks after the surgery for histology, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL studies. Saline treatment in the control animals resulted in a large cavity in the injured brain, whereas no cavity of any significant size was found in the SAPNS-treated animals. Around the lesion site in control animals were many macrophages (ED1 positive) but few TUNEL-positive cells, indicating that the TBI caused secondary tissue loss mainly by means of necrosis, not apoptosis. In the SAPNS-treated animals the graft of SAPNS integrated well with the host tissue with no obvious gaps. Moreover, there were fewer astrocytes (GFAP positive) and macrophages (ED1 positive) around the lesion site in the SAPNS-treated animals than were found in the controls. Thus, SAPNS may help to reconstruct the acutely injured brain and reduce the glial reaction and inflammation in the surrounding brain tissue. From the Clinical Editor: Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) was reported earlier to bridge the injured spinal cord, elicit axon regeneration, and promote locomotor recovery. In this study the effect of SAPNS for the reconstruction of acutely injured brain was investigated. In SAPNS-treated animals the graft integrated well with the host tissue with no obvious gaps. SAPNS may help to reconstruct the acutely injured brain and reduced the glial reaction and inflammation in the surrounding brain tissue. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, And Medicine, 2009, v. 5 n. 3, p. 345-351 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nano.2008.12.001
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nano.2008.12.001
 
dc.identifier.eissn1549-9642
 
dc.identifier.epage351
 
dc.identifier.hkuros164218
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000270570000010
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong Research Grants Council
Funding Information:

Financial support was provided by the University of Hong Kong and Hong Kong Research Grants Council.

 
dc.identifier.issn1549-9634
2013 Impact Factor: 5.978
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19268273
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69249227406
 
dc.identifier.spage345
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58198
 
dc.identifier.volume5
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nanomed
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshBrain - drug effects - pathology - physiopathology - surgery
 
dc.subject.meshBrain Injuries - drug therapy - pathology - surgery - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshCell Movement - drug effects
 
dc.subject.meshCell Survival - drug effects
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistry
 
dc.subject.meshInflammation - immunology
 
dc.subject.meshNanostructures - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshNeuroglia - drug effects - immunology
 
dc.subject.meshPeptides - pharmacology - therapeutic use
 
dc.subject.meshRats
 
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawley
 
dc.subject.meshRegeneration - drug effects
 
dc.subject.meshTissue Scaffolds - chemistry
 
dc.subjectInflammation
 
dc.subjectReconstruction
 
dc.subjectSelf-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold
 
dc.subjectTraumatic brain injury
 
dc.titleSelf-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold promotes the reconstruction of acutely injured brain
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Guo, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Leung, KKG</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Su, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yuan, Q</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wang, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chu, TH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhang, W</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Pu, JKS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ng, GKP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, WM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Dai, X</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wu, W</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2010-05-31T03:25:40Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2010-05-31T03:25:40Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2009</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, And Medicine, 2009, v. 5 n. 3, p. 345-351</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1549-9634</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/58198</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Traumatic brain injury (TBI) or brain surgery may cause extensive loss of cerebral parenchyma. However, no strategy for reconstruction has been clinically effective. Our previous study had shown that self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) can bridge the injured spinal cord, elicit axon regeneration, and eventually promote locomotor functional recovery. In the present study we investigated the effect of SAPNS for the reconstruction of acutely injured brain. The lesion cavity of the injured cortex was filled with SAPNS or saline immediately after surgically induced TBI, and the rats were killed 2 days, 2 weeks, or 6 weeks after the surgery for histology, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL studies. Saline treatment in the control animals resulted in a large cavity in the injured brain, whereas no cavity of any significant size was found in the SAPNS-treated animals. Around the lesion site in control animals were many macrophages (ED1 positive) but few TUNEL-positive cells, indicating that the TBI caused secondary tissue loss mainly by means of necrosis, not apoptosis. In the SAPNS-treated animals the graft of SAPNS integrated well with the host tissue with no obvious gaps. Moreover, there were fewer astrocytes (GFAP positive) and macrophages (ED1 positive) around the lesion site in the SAPNS-treated animals than were found in the controls. Thus, SAPNS may help to reconstruct the acutely injured brain and reduce the glial reaction and inflammation in the surrounding brain tissue. From the Clinical Editor: Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) was reported earlier to bridge the injured spinal cord, elicit axon regeneration, and promote locomotor recovery. In this study the effect of SAPNS for the reconstruction of acutely injured brain was investigated. In SAPNS-treated animals the graft integrated well with the host tissue with no obvious gaps. SAPNS may help to reconstruct the acutely injured brain and reduced the glial reaction and inflammation in the surrounding brain tissue. &#169; 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Elsevier Inc. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nanomed</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine</relation.ispartof>
<rights>Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine. Copyright &#169; Elsevier Inc.</rights>
<subject>Inflammation</subject>
<subject>Reconstruction</subject>
<subject>Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold</subject>
<subject>Traumatic brain injury</subject>
<subject.mesh>Animals</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Brain - drug effects - pathology - physiopathology - surgery</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Brain Injuries - drug therapy - pathology - surgery - therapy</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Cell Movement - drug effects</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Cell Survival - drug effects</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Female</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Immunohistochemistry</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Inflammation - immunology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Nanostructures - chemistry</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Neuroglia - drug effects - immunology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Peptides - pharmacology - therapeutic use</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Rats</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Rats, Sprague-Dawley</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Regeneration - drug effects</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Tissue Scaffolds - chemistry</subject.mesh>
<title>Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold promotes the reconstruction of acutely injured brain</title>
<type>Article</type>
<identifier.openurl>http://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&amp;issn=1549-9634&amp;volume=5&amp;issue=3&amp;spage=345&amp;epage=351&amp;date=2009&amp;atitle=Self-assembling+peptide+nanofiber+scaffold+promotes+the+reconstruction+of+acutely+injured+brain</identifier.openurl>
<description.nature>link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1016/j.nano.2008.12.001</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>19268273</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-69249227406</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>164218</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-69249227406&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>5</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>3</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>345</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>351</identifier.epage>
<identifier.eissn>1549-9642</identifier.eissn>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000270570000010</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United States</publisher.place>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Southern Medical University