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Article: Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold promotes the reconstruction of acutely injured brain

TitleSelf-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold promotes the reconstruction of acutely injured brain
Authors
KeywordsInflammation
Reconstruction
Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold
Traumatic brain injury
Issue Date2009
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nanomed
Citation
Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, And Medicine, 2009, v. 5 n. 3, p. 345-351 How to Cite?
Abstract
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) or brain surgery may cause extensive loss of cerebral parenchyma. However, no strategy for reconstruction has been clinically effective. Our previous study had shown that self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) can bridge the injured spinal cord, elicit axon regeneration, and eventually promote locomotor functional recovery. In the present study we investigated the effect of SAPNS for the reconstruction of acutely injured brain. The lesion cavity of the injured cortex was filled with SAPNS or saline immediately after surgically induced TBI, and the rats were killed 2 days, 2 weeks, or 6 weeks after the surgery for histology, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL studies. Saline treatment in the control animals resulted in a large cavity in the injured brain, whereas no cavity of any significant size was found in the SAPNS-treated animals. Around the lesion site in control animals were many macrophages (ED1 positive) but few TUNEL-positive cells, indicating that the TBI caused secondary tissue loss mainly by means of necrosis, not apoptosis. In the SAPNS-treated animals the graft of SAPNS integrated well with the host tissue with no obvious gaps. Moreover, there were fewer astrocytes (GFAP positive) and macrophages (ED1 positive) around the lesion site in the SAPNS-treated animals than were found in the controls. Thus, SAPNS may help to reconstruct the acutely injured brain and reduce the glial reaction and inflammation in the surrounding brain tissue. From the Clinical Editor: Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) was reported earlier to bridge the injured spinal cord, elicit axon regeneration, and promote locomotor recovery. In this study the effect of SAPNS for the reconstruction of acutely injured brain was investigated. In SAPNS-treated animals the graft integrated well with the host tissue with no obvious gaps. SAPNS may help to reconstruct the acutely injured brain and reduced the glial reaction and inflammation in the surrounding brain tissue. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58198
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 5.978
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong Research Grants Council
Funding Information:

Financial support was provided by the University of Hong Kong and Hong Kong Research Grants Council.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KKGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSu, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorChu, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPu, JKSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, GKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDai, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:25:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:25:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, And Medicine, 2009, v. 5 n. 3, p. 345-351en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1549-9634en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58198-
dc.description.abstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) or brain surgery may cause extensive loss of cerebral parenchyma. However, no strategy for reconstruction has been clinically effective. Our previous study had shown that self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) can bridge the injured spinal cord, elicit axon regeneration, and eventually promote locomotor functional recovery. In the present study we investigated the effect of SAPNS for the reconstruction of acutely injured brain. The lesion cavity of the injured cortex was filled with SAPNS or saline immediately after surgically induced TBI, and the rats were killed 2 days, 2 weeks, or 6 weeks after the surgery for histology, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL studies. Saline treatment in the control animals resulted in a large cavity in the injured brain, whereas no cavity of any significant size was found in the SAPNS-treated animals. Around the lesion site in control animals were many macrophages (ED1 positive) but few TUNEL-positive cells, indicating that the TBI caused secondary tissue loss mainly by means of necrosis, not apoptosis. In the SAPNS-treated animals the graft of SAPNS integrated well with the host tissue with no obvious gaps. Moreover, there were fewer astrocytes (GFAP positive) and macrophages (ED1 positive) around the lesion site in the SAPNS-treated animals than were found in the controls. Thus, SAPNS may help to reconstruct the acutely injured brain and reduce the glial reaction and inflammation in the surrounding brain tissue. From the Clinical Editor: Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) was reported earlier to bridge the injured spinal cord, elicit axon regeneration, and promote locomotor recovery. In this study the effect of SAPNS for the reconstruction of acutely injured brain was investigated. In SAPNS-treated animals the graft integrated well with the host tissue with no obvious gaps. SAPNS may help to reconstruct the acutely injured brain and reduced the glial reaction and inflammation in the surrounding brain tissue. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nanomeden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectInflammationen_HK
dc.subjectReconstructionen_HK
dc.subjectSelf-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolden_HK
dc.subjectTraumatic brain injuryen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBrain - drug effects - pathology - physiopathology - surgeryen_HK
dc.subject.meshBrain Injuries - drug therapy - pathology - surgery - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Movement - drug effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Survival - drug effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshInflammation - immunologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshNanostructures - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshNeuroglia - drug effects - immunologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPeptides - pharmacology - therapeutic useen_HK
dc.subject.meshRatsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawleyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRegeneration - drug effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTissue Scaffolds - chemistryen_HK
dc.titleSelf-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold promotes the reconstruction of acutely injured brainen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1549-9634&volume=5&issue=3&spage=345&epage=351&date=2009&atitle=Self-assembling+peptide+nanofiber+scaffold+promotes+the+reconstruction+of+acutely+injured+brainen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KKG: gilberto@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, W: wtwu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KKG=rp00522en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, W=rp00419en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nano.2008.12.001en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19268273en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69249227406en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros164218en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-69249227406&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage345en_HK
dc.identifier.epage351en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1549-9642-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000270570000010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuo, J=7404488603en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KKG=35965118200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSu, H=16317750200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuan, Q=7202814773en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, L=36851833400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, TH=14023966500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, W=37039036200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPu, JKS=35094475800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, GKP=40262074000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WM=7403972413en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDai, X=35285685000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, W=7407081122en_HK

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