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Article: Influence of residual pockets on progression of periodontitis and tooth loss: Results after 11 years of maintenance
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TitleInfluence of residual pockets on progression of periodontitis and tooth loss: Results after 11 years of maintenance
 
AuthorsMatuliene, G2
Pjetursson, BE2
Salvi, GE2
Schmidlin, K2
Brägger, U2
Zwahlen, M2
Lang, NP2 1
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPE
 
CitationJournal Of Clinical Periodontology, 2008, v. 35 n. 8, p. 685-695 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-051X.2008.01245.x
 
AbstractBackground: Limited evidence exists on the significance of residual probing pocket depth (PPD) as a predictive parameter for periodontal disease progression and tooth loss. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of residual PPD ≥5 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP) after active periodontal therapy (APT) on the progression of periodontitis and tooth loss. Material and Methods: In this retrospective cohort, 172 patients were examined after APT and supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for 3-27 years (mean 11.3 years). Analyses were conducted using information at site, tooth and patient levels. The association of risk factors with tooth loss and progression of periodontitis was investigated using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Results: The number of residual PPD increased during SPT. Compared with PPD≤3 mm, PPD=5 mm represented a risk factor for tooth loss with odds ratios of 5.8 and 7.7, respectively, at site and tooth levels. The corresponding odds ratios for PPD=6 mm were 9.3 and 11.0 and for PPD≥7 mm 37.9 and 64.2, respectively. At patient level, heavy smoking, initial diagnosis, duration of SPT and PPD≥6 mm were risk factors for disease progression, while PPD≥6 mm and BOP≥30% represented a risk for tooth loss. Conclusion: Residual PPD≥6 mm represent an incomplete periodontal treatment outcome and require further therapy. © 2008 The Authors.
 
ISSN0303-6979
2013 Impact Factor: 3.610
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-051X.2008.01245.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000258075600007
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMatuliene, G
 
dc.contributor.authorPjetursson, BE
 
dc.contributor.authorSalvi, GE
 
dc.contributor.authorSchmidlin, K
 
dc.contributor.authorBrägger, U
 
dc.contributor.authorZwahlen, M
 
dc.contributor.authorLang, NP
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:24:13Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:24:13Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Limited evidence exists on the significance of residual probing pocket depth (PPD) as a predictive parameter for periodontal disease progression and tooth loss. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of residual PPD ≥5 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP) after active periodontal therapy (APT) on the progression of periodontitis and tooth loss. Material and Methods: In this retrospective cohort, 172 patients were examined after APT and supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for 3-27 years (mean 11.3 years). Analyses were conducted using information at site, tooth and patient levels. The association of risk factors with tooth loss and progression of periodontitis was investigated using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Results: The number of residual PPD increased during SPT. Compared with PPD≤3 mm, PPD=5 mm represented a risk factor for tooth loss with odds ratios of 5.8 and 7.7, respectively, at site and tooth levels. The corresponding odds ratios for PPD=6 mm were 9.3 and 11.0 and for PPD≥7 mm 37.9 and 64.2, respectively. At patient level, heavy smoking, initial diagnosis, duration of SPT and PPD≥6 mm were risk factors for disease progression, while PPD≥6 mm and BOP≥30% represented a risk for tooth loss. Conclusion: Residual PPD≥6 mm represent an incomplete periodontal treatment outcome and require further therapy. © 2008 The Authors.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Periodontology, 2008, v. 35 n. 8, p. 685-695 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-051X.2008.01245.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike3044281
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-051X.2008.01245.x
 
dc.identifier.epage695
 
dc.identifier.hkuros153601
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258075600007
 
dc.identifier.issn0303-6979
2013 Impact Factor: 3.610
 
dc.identifier.issue8
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid18549447
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-47849118231
 
dc.identifier.spage685
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58124
 
dc.identifier.volume35
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPE
 
dc.publisher.placeDenmark
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Periodontology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies
 
dc.subject.meshDisease Progression
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies
 
dc.subject.meshForecasting
 
dc.subject.meshFurcation Defects - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshGingival Hemorrhage - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshGingival Recession - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studies
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Attachment Loss - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Pocket - physiopathology - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshPeriodontitis - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
 
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
 
dc.subject.meshSmoking - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshTooth Loss - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshTooth Mobility - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
 
dc.titleInfluence of residual pockets on progression of periodontitis and tooth loss: Results after 11 years of maintenance
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Schmidlin, K</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Background: Limited evidence exists on the significance of residual probing pocket depth (PPD) as a predictive parameter for periodontal disease progression and tooth loss. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of residual PPD &#8805;5 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP) after active periodontal therapy (APT) on the progression of periodontitis and tooth loss. Material and Methods: In this retrospective cohort, 172 patients were examined after APT and supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for 3-27 years (mean 11.3 years). Analyses were conducted using information at site, tooth and patient levels. The association of risk factors with tooth loss and progression of periodontitis was investigated using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Results: The number of residual PPD increased during SPT. Compared with PPD&#8804;3 mm, PPD=5 mm represented a risk factor for tooth loss with odds ratios of 5.8 and 7.7, respectively, at site and tooth levels. The corresponding odds ratios for PPD=6 mm were 9.3 and 11.0 and for PPD&#8805;7 mm 37.9 and 64.2, respectively. At patient level, heavy smoking, initial diagnosis, duration of SPT and PPD&#8805;6 mm were risk factors for disease progression, while PPD&#8805;6 mm and BOP&#8805;30% represented a risk for tooth loss. Conclusion: Residual PPD&#8805;6 mm represent an incomplete periodontal treatment outcome and require further therapy. &#169; 2008 The Authors.</description.abstract>
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<subject.mesh>Adolescent</subject.mesh>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Universität Bern