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Article: Oral mucosal fungal infections
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TitleOral mucosal fungal infections
 
AuthorsSamaranayake, LP
Keung Leung, W
Jin, L
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PRD
 
CitationPeriodontology 2000, 2009, v. 49 n. 1, p. 39-59 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0757.2008.00291.x
 
AbstractThis review has provided an overview of variants of oral mucosal candidiasis and current therapeutic techniques followed by an outline of the rare oral mycoses and their management. The advent of the HIV infection and the increasing prevalence of compromised individuals in the community as a consequence of surgical and medical advances have resulted in a resurgence of opportunistic infections, including oral candidiasis and other rare mycoses that were once considered exotic. It is now recognized that oral candidiasis may present in many clinical guises, including the classic white lesion of thrush as well in as nondescript, red mucosal lesions that may confound the unwary clinician. Other mycotic diseases, such as aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis and mucormycosis, may manifest intra-orally, both as primary lesions and as secondary manifestations of systemic disease. Periodontal manifestations of mycotic diseases are rare. If at all, such lesions may present as erythematous areas as in linear gingival erythema and rarely as ulcerations in exotic mycoses. Most of the oral mycoses respond well to either topical or systemic therapy with the polyenes or azoles. In general, the management of oral fungal infections has been revolutionized by the triazole group of drugs, fluconazole and itraconazole, although recent reports indicate an alarming increase of resistant organisms, in particular to fluconazole. © 2009 Blackwell Munksgaard.
 
ISSN0906-6713
2012 Impact Factor: 4.012
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.112
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0757.2008.00291.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000261838700003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LP
 
dc.contributor.authorKeung Leung, W
 
dc.contributor.authorJin, L
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:23:55Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:23:55Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractThis review has provided an overview of variants of oral mucosal candidiasis and current therapeutic techniques followed by an outline of the rare oral mycoses and their management. The advent of the HIV infection and the increasing prevalence of compromised individuals in the community as a consequence of surgical and medical advances have resulted in a resurgence of opportunistic infections, including oral candidiasis and other rare mycoses that were once considered exotic. It is now recognized that oral candidiasis may present in many clinical guises, including the classic white lesion of thrush as well in as nondescript, red mucosal lesions that may confound the unwary clinician. Other mycotic diseases, such as aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis and mucormycosis, may manifest intra-orally, both as primary lesions and as secondary manifestations of systemic disease. Periodontal manifestations of mycotic diseases are rare. If at all, such lesions may present as erythematous areas as in linear gingival erythema and rarely as ulcerations in exotic mycoses. Most of the oral mycoses respond well to either topical or systemic therapy with the polyenes or azoles. In general, the management of oral fungal infections has been revolutionized by the triazole group of drugs, fluconazole and itraconazole, although recent reports indicate an alarming increase of resistant organisms, in particular to fluconazole. © 2009 Blackwell Munksgaard.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationPeriodontology 2000, 2009, v. 49 n. 1, p. 39-59 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0757.2008.00291.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike3821160
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0757.2008.00291.x
 
dc.identifier.eissn1600-0757
 
dc.identifier.epage59
 
dc.identifier.hkuros154199
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000261838700003
 
dc.identifier.issn0906-6713
2012 Impact Factor: 4.012
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.112
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19152525
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-57849103561
 
dc.identifier.spage39
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/58107
 
dc.identifier.volume49
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PRD
 
dc.publisher.placeDenmark
 
dc.relation.ispartofPeriodontology 2000
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAntifungal Agents - therapeutic use
 
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - complications - drug therapy - microbiology - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshDenture, Complete, Upper - adverse effects
 
dc.subject.meshHIV Infections - complications
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMouth Mucosa - microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshMycoses - drug therapy - microbiology - pathology
 
dc.titleOral mucosal fungal infections
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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