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Article: 'Exotic eroticism': Gwendolen Harleth and Daniel Deronda

Title'Exotic eroticism': Gwendolen Harleth and Daniel Deronda
Authors
Issue Date2009
Citation
Cahiers Victoriens And Edouardiens, 2009, v. 2009 n. 69, p. 97-114+8-9 How to Cite?
AbstractThe essay looks once more at the relationship between the two protagonists of George Eliot's final novel. It argues that rather than through issues of class, as scholars have conventionally argued, Gwendolen Harleth's interest in Daniel Deronda must be understood through the ethnic otherness he represents. He is, as the first chapter construes it so unmistakably, 'different' from the men this young Englishwoman normally socialises with, and the enquiry into Deronda's origins and heritage is pursued alongside questions of his perceived 'un-Englishness'. The essay introduces the paradigm of "the exotic erotic" - adapted from Judith Butler's Bodies that Matter - to explore Gwendolen Harleth's simultaneous racialising and sexualising of Daniel Deronda. A brief overview of recent postcolonial reassessments of the concept of "exoticism", and of Butler's reinterpretation into the context of gender studies, precedes the close reading of the literary text.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57920
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKuehn, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:20:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:20:36Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCahiers Victoriens And Edouardiens, 2009, v. 2009 n. 69, p. 97-114+8-9en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0220-5610en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57920-
dc.description.abstractThe essay looks once more at the relationship between the two protagonists of George Eliot's final novel. It argues that rather than through issues of class, as scholars have conventionally argued, Gwendolen Harleth's interest in Daniel Deronda must be understood through the ethnic otherness he represents. He is, as the first chapter construes it so unmistakably, 'different' from the men this young Englishwoman normally socialises with, and the enquiry into Deronda's origins and heritage is pursued alongside questions of his perceived 'un-Englishness'. The essay introduces the paradigm of "the exotic erotic" - adapted from Judith Butler's Bodies that Matter - to explore Gwendolen Harleth's simultaneous racialising and sexualising of Daniel Deronda. A brief overview of recent postcolonial reassessments of the concept of "exoticism", and of Butler's reinterpretation into the context of gender studies, precedes the close reading of the literary text.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCahiers Victoriens and Edouardiensen_HK
dc.title'Exotic eroticism': Gwendolen Harleth and Daniel Derondaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKuehn, J: jkuehn@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKuehn, J=rp01167en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77949444515en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154926en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77949444515&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume2009en_HK
dc.identifier.issue69en_HK
dc.identifier.spage97en_HK
dc.identifier.epage114+8en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKuehn, J=35746273700en_HK

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