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Article: Regulating risk or risking regulation? Construal levels and depletion effects in the processing of health messages

TitleRegulating risk or risking regulation? Construal levels and depletion effects in the processing of health messages
Authors
KeywordsCommunication in medicine
Health behavior
Self-control
Goal (Psychology)
Task assessment
Health attitudes
Issue Date2009
PublisherUniversity of Chicago Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JCR
Citation
Journal Of Consumer Research, 2009, v. 36 n. 3, p. 448-462 How to Cite?
AbstractThe depletion effect occurs when individuals who exert self-control in a previous task (i.e., depleted individuals) exhibit less self-control on a subsequent task relative to individuals who did not previously exert self-control. This article presents two experiments that implicate construal levels to understand the processes underlying depletion effects in the context of consumer health. At low-level construals, individuals rely on resource accessibility cues (e.g., feelings of tiredness) to determine self-control. Hence, they exert less self-control only when they assess themselves as depleted, manifesting the depletion effect. High-level construals reduce the resource focus and enhance a goal focus, which diminishes and even reverses the depletion effect. © 2009 by Journal of Consumer Research, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57672
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.896
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAgrawal, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWan, EWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-14T07:09:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-14T07:09:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Consumer Research, 2009, v. 36 n. 3, p. 448-462en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0093-5301en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57672-
dc.description.abstractThe depletion effect occurs when individuals who exert self-control in a previous task (i.e., depleted individuals) exhibit less self-control on a subsequent task relative to individuals who did not previously exert self-control. This article presents two experiments that implicate construal levels to understand the processes underlying depletion effects in the context of consumer health. At low-level construals, individuals rely on resource accessibility cues (e.g., feelings of tiredness) to determine self-control. Hence, they exert less self-control only when they assess themselves as depleted, manifesting the depletion effect. High-level construals reduce the resource focus and enhance a goal focus, which diminishes and even reverses the depletion effect. © 2009 by Journal of Consumer Research, Inc.en_HK
dc.language.isoengen_HK
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JCRen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Consumer Researchen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCommunication in medicineen_HK
dc.subjectHealth behavioren_HK
dc.subjectSelf-controlen_HK
dc.subjectGoal (Psychology)en_HK
dc.subjectTask assessmenten_HK
dc.subjectHealth attitudesen_HK
dc.titleRegulating risk or risking regulation? Construal levels and depletion effects in the processing of health messagesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWan, EW: ewwan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWan, EW=rp01105en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/597331en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70149102222en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros156330en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70149102222&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage448en_HK
dc.identifier.epage462en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1537-5277-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269564400009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAgrawal, N=16642291500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, EW=23052867400en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4113339-

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