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Article: Relationship between five common viruses and febrile seizure in children

TitleRelationship between five common viruses and febrile seizure in children
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/
Citation
Archives Of Disease In Childhood, 2007, v. 92 n. 7, p. 589-593 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To examine the role of viruses in febrile seizures (FS) by comparing the relative risk (RR) of developing FS with common viral infections and subsequent risk of recurrence. Methods: We matched the medical records of all children admitted with FS over 5 years and the contemporary records for all admissions for febrile illnesses associated with influenza, adenovirus, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rotavirus to calculate the RR of FS following these viral infections. For patients admitted for a first FS, we carried multivariate analysis for type of viral infection, age of onset, family history, complex FS features and maximum temperature during the episode, to identify the risk factors for recurrence. Results: There were 923 admissions for FS, of which 565 were for first seizures. The five most common viruses in FS were influenza (163/923, 17.6%), adenovirus (63/923, 6.8%), parainfluenza (55/923, 6%), RSV (25/923, 2.7%) and rotavirus (12/923, 1.3%). Incidences of FS in febrile illnesses due to these viruses were 20.8% (163/785) for influenza, 20.6% (55/267) for parainfluenza, 18.4% (63/343) for adenovirus, 5.3% (25/468) for RSV and 4.3% (12/280) for rotavirus. Complex FS occurred in 20.6% (n=191) and the risk of developing complex FS was similar for the five viruses. Overall recurrence rate was 20.5% and was not predicted by type of viral infection. Conclusion: The risk of developing FS is similar with influenza, adenovirus or parainfluenza and is higher than with RSV or rotavirus. Type of viral infection is not important in predicting complex features or future recurrences.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57548
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.231
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.118
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ven_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:39:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:39:47Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Disease In Childhood, 2007, v. 92 n. 7, p. 589-593en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0003-9888en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57548-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To examine the role of viruses in febrile seizures (FS) by comparing the relative risk (RR) of developing FS with common viral infections and subsequent risk of recurrence. Methods: We matched the medical records of all children admitted with FS over 5 years and the contemporary records for all admissions for febrile illnesses associated with influenza, adenovirus, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rotavirus to calculate the RR of FS following these viral infections. For patients admitted for a first FS, we carried multivariate analysis for type of viral infection, age of onset, family history, complex FS features and maximum temperature during the episode, to identify the risk factors for recurrence. Results: There were 923 admissions for FS, of which 565 were for first seizures. The five most common viruses in FS were influenza (163/923, 17.6%), adenovirus (63/923, 6.8%), parainfluenza (55/923, 6%), RSV (25/923, 2.7%) and rotavirus (12/923, 1.3%). Incidences of FS in febrile illnesses due to these viruses were 20.8% (163/785) for influenza, 20.6% (55/267) for parainfluenza, 18.4% (63/343) for adenovirus, 5.3% (25/468) for RSV and 4.3% (12/280) for rotavirus. Complex FS occurred in 20.6% (n=191) and the risk of developing complex FS was similar for the five viruses. Overall recurrence rate was 20.5% and was not predicted by type of viral infection. Conclusion: The risk of developing FS is similar with influenza, adenovirus or parainfluenza and is higher than with RSV or rotavirus. Type of viral infection is not important in predicting complex features or future recurrences.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Disease in Childhooden_HK
dc.rightsArchives of Disease in Childhood. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshSeizures, Febrile - genetics - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshVirus Diseases - complicationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdenoviridae Infections - complicationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAge of Onseten_HK
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - complicationsen_HK
dc.titleRelationship between five common viruses and febrile seizure in childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0003-9888&volume=92&issue=7&spage=589&epage=593&date=2007&atitle=Relationship+between+five+common+viruses+and+febrile+seizure+in+childrenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, B:bhychung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, V:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, B=rp00473en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, V=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/adc.2006.110221en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17284480-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2083759-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34347340636en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros129578-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34347340636&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume92en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage589en_HK
dc.identifier.epage593en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247471800009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, B=7203043997en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, V=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2890547-

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