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Article: The versatile reverse flow sural artery neurocutaneous flap: A case series and review of literature

TitleThe versatile reverse flow sural artery neurocutaneous flap: A case series and review of literature
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Orthopedics and traumatology
Issue Date2008
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.josr-online.com/home
Citation
Journal Of Orthopaedic Surgery And Research, 2008, v. 3 n. 1 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Reverse flow sural neurocutaneous flap has been utilized more frequently during the past decade to cover vital structures around the foot and ankle area. The potential advantages are the relatively constant blood supply, ease of elevation and preservation of major vascular trunks in the leg. The potential disadvantages remain venous congestion, donor site morbidity and lack of sensation. Methods. This descriptive case series was conducted at Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, from 1997 to 2003. Ten patients having undergone reverse flow sural neurocutaneous flap were identified through medical records. There were six females (60%) and four males (40%), with an average age of 59.8 years. The defects occurred as a result of trauma in five patients (50%), diabetic ulcers in four (40%) and decubitus ulcer in one (10%) paraplegic patient. The defect site included non weight bearing heel in four (40%), tendo Achilles in two (20%), distal tibia in two (20%), lateral malleolus in one (10%) and medial aspect of the midfoot in one patient (10%). The maximum flap size harvested was 14 × 6 cm. Preoperative doppler evaluation was performed in all patients to identify perforators and modified plaster of paris boot was used in the post operative period. A detailed questionnaire was developed addressing variables of interest. Results. There was no flap failure. Venous congestion was encountered in one case. The donor site was relatively unsightly but acceptable to all patients. The loss of sensation in the sural nerve distribution was transient in all patients. Conclusion. Reverse sural artery flap remains to be the workhorse flap to resurface the soft tissue defects of the foot and ankle. Anastomosis of the sural nerve to the digital plantar nerve can potentially solve the issue of lack of sensation in the flap especially when used for weight bearing heel.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57504
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.215
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905
PubMed Central ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, BKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIp, WYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFok, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, SPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:38:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:38:28Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Orthopaedic Surgery And Research, 2008, v. 3 n. 1en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1749-799Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57504-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Reverse flow sural neurocutaneous flap has been utilized more frequently during the past decade to cover vital structures around the foot and ankle area. The potential advantages are the relatively constant blood supply, ease of elevation and preservation of major vascular trunks in the leg. The potential disadvantages remain venous congestion, donor site morbidity and lack of sensation. Methods. This descriptive case series was conducted at Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, from 1997 to 2003. Ten patients having undergone reverse flow sural neurocutaneous flap were identified through medical records. There were six females (60%) and four males (40%), with an average age of 59.8 years. The defects occurred as a result of trauma in five patients (50%), diabetic ulcers in four (40%) and decubitus ulcer in one (10%) paraplegic patient. The defect site included non weight bearing heel in four (40%), tendo Achilles in two (20%), distal tibia in two (20%), lateral malleolus in one (10%) and medial aspect of the midfoot in one patient (10%). The maximum flap size harvested was 14 × 6 cm. Preoperative doppler evaluation was performed in all patients to identify perforators and modified plaster of paris boot was used in the post operative period. A detailed questionnaire was developed addressing variables of interest. Results. There was no flap failure. Venous congestion was encountered in one case. The donor site was relatively unsightly but acceptable to all patients. The loss of sensation in the sural nerve distribution was transient in all patients. Conclusion. Reverse sural artery flap remains to be the workhorse flap to resurface the soft tissue defects of the foot and ankle. Anastomosis of the sural nerve to the digital plantar nerve can potentially solve the issue of lack of sensation in the flap especially when used for weight bearing heel.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.josr-online.com/homeen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Researchen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectMedical sciencesen_HK
dc.subjectOrthopedics and traumatologyen_HK
dc.titleThe versatile reverse flow sural artery neurocutaneous flap: A case series and review of literatureen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1749-799X&volume=3 article no. 15&spage=&epage=&date=2008&atitle=The+versatile+reverse+flow+sural+artery+neurocutaneous+flap:+a+case+series+and+review+of+literatureen_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, WY: wyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChow, SP: spchow@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIp, WY=rp00401en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChow, SP=rp00064en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1749-799X-3-15en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18423034en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2373287en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-43349093372en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros149835-
dc.identifier.hkuros166985-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-43349093372&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAhmed, SK=24175846100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, BKK=7103203800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, WY=35549641700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFok, M=22941111900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, SP=7201828376en_HK

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