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Article: Prolonged exposure to bacterial toxins downregulated expression of toll-like receptors in mesenchymal stromal cell-derived osteoprogenitors

TitleProlonged exposure to bacterial toxins downregulated expression of toll-like receptors in mesenchymal stromal cell-derived osteoprogenitors
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmccellbiol/
Citation
Bmc Cell Biology, 2008, v. 9 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, also known as mesenchymal stem cells) are multipotent cells with potential therapeutic value. Owing to their osteogenic capability, MSCs may be clinically applied for facilitating osseointegration in dental implants or orthopedic repair of bony defect. However, whether wound infection or oral microflora may interfere with the growth and osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs remains unknown. This study investigated whether proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs would be affected by potent gram-positive and gram-negative derived bacterial toxins commonly found in human settings. Results: We selected lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Streptococcus pyogenes as our toxins of choice. Our findings showed both LPS and LTA did not affect MSC proliferation, but prolonged LPS challenge upregulated the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs, as assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition. Because toll-like receptors (TLRs), in particularly TLR4 and TLR2, are important for the cellular responsiveness to LPS and LTA respectively, we evaluated their expression profiles serially from MSCs to osteoblasts by quantitative PCR. We found that during osteogenic differentiation, MSC-derived osteoprogenitors gradually expressed TLR2 and TLR4 by Day 12. But under prolonged incubation with LPS, MSC-derived osteoprogenitors had reduced TLR2 and TLR4 gene expression. This peculiar response to LPS suggests a possible adaptive mechanism when MSCs are subjected to continuous exposure with bacteria. Conclusion: In conclusion, our findings support the potential of using human MSCs as a biological graft, even under a bacterial toxin-rich environment. © 2008 Mo et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57421
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.584
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.486
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMo, IFYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, KHKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, HKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, GCFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:36:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:36:08Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Cell Biology, 2008, v. 9en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1471-2121en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57421-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, also known as mesenchymal stem cells) are multipotent cells with potential therapeutic value. Owing to their osteogenic capability, MSCs may be clinically applied for facilitating osseointegration in dental implants or orthopedic repair of bony defect. However, whether wound infection or oral microflora may interfere with the growth and osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs remains unknown. This study investigated whether proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs would be affected by potent gram-positive and gram-negative derived bacterial toxins commonly found in human settings. Results: We selected lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Streptococcus pyogenes as our toxins of choice. Our findings showed both LPS and LTA did not affect MSC proliferation, but prolonged LPS challenge upregulated the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs, as assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition. Because toll-like receptors (TLRs), in particularly TLR4 and TLR2, are important for the cellular responsiveness to LPS and LTA respectively, we evaluated their expression profiles serially from MSCs to osteoblasts by quantitative PCR. We found that during osteogenic differentiation, MSC-derived osteoprogenitors gradually expressed TLR2 and TLR4 by Day 12. But under prolonged incubation with LPS, MSC-derived osteoprogenitors had reduced TLR2 and TLR4 gene expression. This peculiar response to LPS suggests a possible adaptive mechanism when MSCs are subjected to continuous exposure with bacteria. Conclusion: In conclusion, our findings support the potential of using human MSCs as a biological graft, even under a bacterial toxin-rich environment. © 2008 Mo et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmccellbiol/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Cell Biologyen_HK
dc.rightsB M C Cell Biology. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshBacterial Toxins - pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDown-Regulationen_HK
dc.subject.meshMesenchymal Stem Cells - cytology - drug effects - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshOsteoblasts - cytologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiationen_HK
dc.titleProlonged exposure to bacterial toxins downregulated expression of toll-like receptors in mesenchymal stromal cell-derived osteoprogenitorsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1471-2121&volume=9 article no. 52&spage=&epage=&date=2008&atitle=Prolonged+exposure+to+bacterial+toxins+downregulated+expression+of+toll-like+receptors+in+mesenchymal+stromal+cell-derived+osteoprogenitorsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, KHK: kevin.h.k.yip@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, GCF: gcfchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, KHK=rp00027en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, GCF=rp00431en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2121-9-52en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18799018en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2567970en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-54049148607en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros152712-
dc.identifier.hkuros145720-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-54049148607&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume9en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000260112300001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMo, IFY=25422283300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, KHK=25423244900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, WK=55471357400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, HKW=7101939394en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, YL=7201403380en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, GCF=16160154400en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike3285084-

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