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Article: Reading in two writing systems: Accommodation and assimilation of the brain's reading network

TitleReading in two writing systems: Accommodation and assimilation of the brain's reading network
Authors
KeywordsLinguistics
Issue Date2007
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BIL
Citation
Bilingualism, 2007, v. 10 n. 2, p. 131-146 How to Cite?
AbstractBilingual reading can require more than knowing two languages. Learners must acquire also the writing conventions of their second language, which can differ in its deep mapping principles (writing system) and its visual configurations (script). We review ERP (event-related potential) and fMRI studies of both Chinese-English bilingualism and Chinese second language learning that bear on the system accommodation hypothesis: the neural networks acquired for one system must be modified to accommodate the demands of a new system. ERP bilingual studies demonstrate temporal indicators of the brain's experience with L1 and L2 and with the frequency of encounters of words in L2. ERP learning studies show that early visual processing differences between L1 and L2 diminish during a second term of study. fMRI studies of learning converge in finding that learners recruit bilateral occipital-temporal and also middle frontal areas when reading Chinese, similar to the pattern of native speakers and different from alphabetic reading. The evidence suggests an asymmetry: alphabetic readers have a neural network that accommodates the demands of Chinese by recruiting neural structures less needed for alphabetic reading. Chinese readers have a neural network that partly assimilates English into the Chinese system, especially in the visual stages of word identification. © Cambridge University Press 2007.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57398
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.33
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.359
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPerfetti, CAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFiez, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBolger, DJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:35:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:35:19Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBilingualism, 2007, v. 10 n. 2, p. 131-146en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1366-7289en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57398-
dc.description.abstractBilingual reading can require more than knowing two languages. Learners must acquire also the writing conventions of their second language, which can differ in its deep mapping principles (writing system) and its visual configurations (script). We review ERP (event-related potential) and fMRI studies of both Chinese-English bilingualism and Chinese second language learning that bear on the system accommodation hypothesis: the neural networks acquired for one system must be modified to accommodate the demands of a new system. ERP bilingual studies demonstrate temporal indicators of the brain's experience with L1 and L2 and with the frequency of encounters of words in L2. ERP learning studies show that early visual processing differences between L1 and L2 diminish during a second term of study. fMRI studies of learning converge in finding that learners recruit bilateral occipital-temporal and also middle frontal areas when reading Chinese, similar to the pattern of native speakers and different from alphabetic reading. The evidence suggests an asymmetry: alphabetic readers have a neural network that accommodates the demands of Chinese by recruiting neural structures less needed for alphabetic reading. Chinese readers have a neural network that partly assimilates English into the Chinese system, especially in the visual stages of word identification. © Cambridge University Press 2007.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BILen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBilingualismen_HK
dc.rightsBilingualism: Language and Cognition. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectLinguisticsen_HK
dc.titleReading in two writing systems: Accommodation and assimilation of the brain's reading networken_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1366-7289&volume=10&issue=2&spage=131&epage=146&date=2007&atitle=Reading+in+two+writing+systems:+accommodation+and+assimilation+of+the+brain’s+reading+networken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1366728907002891en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34447281120en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34447281120&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage131en_HK
dc.identifier.epage146en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248258100003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPerfetti, CA=7005318729en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, Y=36072260300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFiez, J=7004545341en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNelson, J=7404794879en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBolger, DJ=8523495300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_HK

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