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Article: Is leg length a biomarker of childhood conditions in older Chinese women? The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitleIs leg length a biomarker of childhood conditions in older Chinese women? The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2008, v. 62 n. 2, p. 160-167 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: In developed western populations longer legs have been shown to be a biomarker of better early childhood conditions. It was hypothesised that in transitioning populations better childhood conditions may bring forward puberty and thus decrease leg length, counteracting the overall positive effect of a favourable childhood environment on leg growth. Design: Structural equation modelling was used to assess the interrelationship of age, education, father's job, age of menarche and leg length in a cross-sectional sample of 7273 Chinese women aged at least 50 years from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Results: Leg length had no significant association with education or father's occupation on bivariable testing. After including age of menarche in the model, education was associated with longer legs (0.45 cm longer per 10 years of education, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.71). Education was also associated with younger age of menarche (1.21 years younger per 10 years of education, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.34), which was in turn associated with shorter legs (0.23 cm shorter per year of menarche earlier, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.27). Conclusions: In older Chinese women leg length is not a universal biomarker of childhood conditions, when proxied by her educational level and father's occupation. Nutritionally driven epigenetic influences operating over generations may constrain growth in very recently developed populations. Given the impact of childhood conditions on health, and the dearth of long-term records outside the industrialised world, a greater understanding of the influences on growth in the developing world is required.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57374
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHeys, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLao, XQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAdab, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:34:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:34:34Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2008, v. 62 n. 2, p. 160-167en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57374-
dc.description.abstractObjective: In developed western populations longer legs have been shown to be a biomarker of better early childhood conditions. It was hypothesised that in transitioning populations better childhood conditions may bring forward puberty and thus decrease leg length, counteracting the overall positive effect of a favourable childhood environment on leg growth. Design: Structural equation modelling was used to assess the interrelationship of age, education, father's job, age of menarche and leg length in a cross-sectional sample of 7273 Chinese women aged at least 50 years from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Results: Leg length had no significant association with education or father's occupation on bivariable testing. After including age of menarche in the model, education was associated with longer legs (0.45 cm longer per 10 years of education, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.71). Education was also associated with younger age of menarche (1.21 years younger per 10 years of education, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.34), which was in turn associated with shorter legs (0.23 cm shorter per year of menarche earlier, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.27). Conclusions: In older Chinese women leg length is not a universal biomarker of childhood conditions, when proxied by her educational level and father's occupation. Nutritionally driven epigenetic influences operating over generations may constrain growth in very recently developed populations. Given the impact of childhood conditions on health, and the dearth of long-term records outside the industrialised world, a greater understanding of the influences on growth in the developing world is required.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshLeg - anatomy & histologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocial Conditions - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnthropometry - methodsen_HK
dc.titleIs leg length a biomarker of childhood conditions in older Chinese women? The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0143-005X&volume=62&issue=2&spage=160&epage=167&date=2008&atitle=Is+leg+length+a+biomarker+of+childhood+conditions+in+older+Chinese+women?++The+Guangzhou+Biobank+Cohort+Studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHeys, M: m_heys@lycos.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHeys, M=rp00257en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2006.058917en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18192605-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38849202510en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros139810-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-38849202510&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume62en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage160en_HK
dc.identifier.epage167en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000252301900012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeys, M=22234232400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=13410704100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, XQ=14031637000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAdab, P=6601949045en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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