Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Smoking, quitting and mortality in an elderly cohort of 56 000 Hong Kong Chinese

TitleSmoking, quitting and mortality in an elderly cohort of 56 000 Hong Kong Chinese
Authors
KeywordsTobacco medical sciences
Issue Date2007
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://tc.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Tobacco Control, 2007, v. 16 n. 3, p. 182-189 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Although the harms of smoking are well established, it is unclear how they extend into old age in the Chinese. Aim: To examine the relationship of smoking with all-cause and major cause-specific mortality in elderly Chinese men and women, respectively, in Hong Kong. Methods: Mortality by smoking status was examined in a prospective cohort study of 56 167 (18 749 men, 37 416 women) Chinese aged ≥65 years enrolled from 1998 to 2000 at all the 18 elderly health centres of the Hong Kong Government Department of Health. Results: After a mean follow-up of 4.1 years, 1848 male and 2035 female deaths occured among 54 214 subjects (96.5% successful follow-up). At baseline, more men than women were current smokers (20.3% vs 4.0%) and former smokers (40.8% vs 7.9%). The adjusted RRs (95% Cl) for all-cause mortality in former and current smokers, compared with never smokers, were 1.39 (1.23 to 1.56) and 1.75 (1.53 to 2.00) in men and 1.43 (1.25 to 1.64) and 1.38 (1.14 to 1.68) in women, respectively. For current smokers, the RRs (95% Cl) for all-cause mortality were 1.59 (1.39 to 1.82), 1.72 (1.48 to 2.00) and 1.84 (1.43 to 2.35) for daily consumption of 1-9, 10-20 and >21 cigarettes, respectively (p for trend <0.001). RRs (95% Cl) were 1.49 (1.30 to 1.72) and 2.20 (1.88 to 2.57) in former and current smokers for all deaths from cancer, and 1.24 (1.04 to 1.47) and 1.57 (1.28 to 1.94) for all cardiovascular deaths, respectively. Quitters had significantly lower risks of death than current smokers from all causes, lung cancer, all cancers, stroke and all cardiovascular diseases. Conclusions: In old age, smoking continues to be a major cause of death, and quitting is beneficial. Smoking cessation is urgently needed in rapidly ageing populations in the East.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57370
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.321
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.855
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, ZBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, KSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTham, MKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:34:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:34:29Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTobacco Control, 2007, v. 16 n. 3, p. 182-189en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0964-4563en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57370-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although the harms of smoking are well established, it is unclear how they extend into old age in the Chinese. Aim: To examine the relationship of smoking with all-cause and major cause-specific mortality in elderly Chinese men and women, respectively, in Hong Kong. Methods: Mortality by smoking status was examined in a prospective cohort study of 56 167 (18 749 men, 37 416 women) Chinese aged ≥65 years enrolled from 1998 to 2000 at all the 18 elderly health centres of the Hong Kong Government Department of Health. Results: After a mean follow-up of 4.1 years, 1848 male and 2035 female deaths occured among 54 214 subjects (96.5% successful follow-up). At baseline, more men than women were current smokers (20.3% vs 4.0%) and former smokers (40.8% vs 7.9%). The adjusted RRs (95% Cl) for all-cause mortality in former and current smokers, compared with never smokers, were 1.39 (1.23 to 1.56) and 1.75 (1.53 to 2.00) in men and 1.43 (1.25 to 1.64) and 1.38 (1.14 to 1.68) in women, respectively. For current smokers, the RRs (95% Cl) for all-cause mortality were 1.59 (1.39 to 1.82), 1.72 (1.48 to 2.00) and 1.84 (1.43 to 2.35) for daily consumption of 1-9, 10-20 and >21 cigarettes, respectively (p for trend <0.001). RRs (95% Cl) were 1.49 (1.30 to 1.72) and 2.20 (1.88 to 2.57) in former and current smokers for all deaths from cancer, and 1.24 (1.04 to 1.47) and 1.57 (1.28 to 1.94) for all cardiovascular deaths, respectively. Quitters had significantly lower risks of death than current smokers from all causes, lung cancer, all cancers, stroke and all cardiovascular diseases. Conclusions: In old age, smoking continues to be a major cause of death, and quitting is beneficial. Smoking cessation is urgently needed in rapidly ageing populations in the East.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://tc.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTobacco Controlen_HK
dc.rightsTobacco Control. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectTobacco medical sciencesen_HK
dc.titleSmoking, quitting and mortality in an elderly cohort of 56 000 Hong Kong Chineseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0964-4563&volume=16&issue=3&spage=182&epage=189&date=2007&atitle=Smoking,+quitting+and+mortality+in+an+elderly+cohort+of+56000+Hong+Kong+Chineseen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ:bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/tc.2006.019505en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17565138-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2598507-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34347236534en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros128005-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34347236534&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage182en_HK
dc.identifier.epage189en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247204900017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, ZB=7409078634en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, WM=7403914485en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, KS=7403581605en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTham, MK=16679910000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats