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Article: The impact of a false-positive result from breast cancer mammography: a qualitative pilot study

TitleThe impact of a false-positive result from breast cancer mammography: a qualitative pilot study
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Issue Date2007
PublisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2007, v. 13, suppl. 1, p. 16-19 How to Cite?
AbstractPopulation mammographic screening to detect asymptomatic breast cancer for women over 40 years of age is common in developed countries, but remains controversial. Risks include anxiety and unnecessary investigations. Up to 1 000 000 false positives occur annually among 40- to 50-year-old American women. False positive test results increase anxiety, refusal to take future screening, and difficulty with accepting that the ‘all clear’ result really is correct. Most studies assessing the impact of false positive results in screening have been on Caucasian, African-American, Latina, and, rarely, Chinese women. We found no reports in the literature on the effects of false positive mammography results among Hong Kong Chinese women. Using qualitative methods, we studied the impact of false positive test results on these women.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57367
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:34:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:34:25Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2007, v. 13, suppl. 1, p. 16-19en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57367-
dc.description.abstractPopulation mammographic screening to detect asymptomatic breast cancer for women over 40 years of age is common in developed countries, but remains controversial. Risks include anxiety and unnecessary investigations. Up to 1 000 000 false positives occur annually among 40- to 50-year-old American women. False positive test results increase anxiety, refusal to take future screening, and difficulty with accepting that the ‘all clear’ result really is correct. Most studies assessing the impact of false positive results in screening have been on Caucasian, African-American, Latina, and, rarely, Chinese women. We found no reports in the literature on the effects of false positive mammography results among Hong Kong Chinese women. Using qualitative methods, we studied the impact of false positive test results on these women.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hken_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journal-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Medical Association.-
dc.subjectMedical sciencesen_HK
dc.titleThe impact of a false-positive result from breast cancer mammography: a qualitative pilot studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1024-2708&volume=13&issue=1 Suppl 1&spage=S16&epage=S19&date=2007&atitle=The+impact+of+a+false-positive+result+from+breast+cancer+mammography:+a+qualitative+pilot+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros131911-
dc.identifier.volume13, suppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage16-
dc.identifier.epage19-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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