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Article: Challenges to globalisation, localisation, and Sinophilia in music education: a comparative study of Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Taipei

TitleChallenges to globalisation, localisation, and Sinophilia in music education: a comparative study of Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Taipei
Authors
KeywordsMusic
Issue Date2006
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BME
Citation
British Journal of Music Education, 2006, v. 23 n. 2, p. 217-237 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the past, the music curricula of Hong Kong (HK), Mainland China and Taiwan have focused on Western music, but with the advent of music technology and the new tripartite paradigm of globalisation, localisation and Sinophilia this has begun to change. Hong Kong, Shanghai and Taipei share a common historical culture and their populations are mainly Chinese, but their recent socio-political experiences have been diverse. This paper aims to explore the secondary school cultures of Hong Kong, Shanghai and Taipei by examining the similarities and differences between their musical practices and the ways in which they have delineated this tripartite paradigm. Data are drawn from questionnaires completed by 5,133 students (1,750 from HK, 1,741 from Shanghai, and 1,642 from Taipei) attending grades 7 to 9 and interviews with their 46 music teachers between March and August 2004. The survey data show that students from the three communities much prefer Western classical and popular music to their respective forms of local traditional music and to traditional Chinese styles. Though most music teachers recognise the importance of teaching traditional Chinese music, local traditional music, and other world music in schools, they believe that it is difficult to teach different types of music in the classroom. This article argues that globalisation is leading to a common cosmopolitan culture of Western musical learning in school; the emergence of traditional Chinese music, local music, and socio-political movements challenge globalisation in school music education.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57349
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.184
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.391

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:33:55Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:33:55Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Music Education, 2006, v. 23 n. 2, p. 217-237en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0265-0517en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57349-
dc.description.abstractIn the past, the music curricula of Hong Kong (HK), Mainland China and Taiwan have focused on Western music, but with the advent of music technology and the new tripartite paradigm of globalisation, localisation and Sinophilia this has begun to change. Hong Kong, Shanghai and Taipei share a common historical culture and their populations are mainly Chinese, but their recent socio-political experiences have been diverse. This paper aims to explore the secondary school cultures of Hong Kong, Shanghai and Taipei by examining the similarities and differences between their musical practices and the ways in which they have delineated this tripartite paradigm. Data are drawn from questionnaires completed by 5,133 students (1,750 from HK, 1,741 from Shanghai, and 1,642 from Taipei) attending grades 7 to 9 and interviews with their 46 music teachers between March and August 2004. The survey data show that students from the three communities much prefer Western classical and popular music to their respective forms of local traditional music and to traditional Chinese styles. Though most music teachers recognise the importance of teaching traditional Chinese music, local traditional music, and other world music in schools, they believe that it is difficult to teach different types of music in the classroom. This article argues that globalisation is leading to a common cosmopolitan culture of Western musical learning in school; the emergence of traditional Chinese music, local music, and socio-political movements challenge globalisation in school music education.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BMEen_HK
dc.rightsBritish Journal of Music Education. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectMusicen_HK
dc.titleChallenges to globalisation, localisation, and Sinophilia in music education: a comparative study of Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Taipeien_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0265-0517&volume=23&issue=2&spage=217&epage=237&date=2006&atitle=Challenges+to+globalisation,+localisation,+and+Sinophilia+in+music+education:+a+comparative+study+of+Hong+Kong,+Shanghai,+and+Taipeien_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, WW: wwlaw@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S026505170600694en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros118557-

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