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Article: Clinical and molecular epidemiology of human bocavirus in respiratory and fecal samples from children in Hong Kong

TitleClinical and molecular epidemiology of human bocavirus in respiratory and fecal samples from children in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jid.oxfordjournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Infectious Diseases, 2007, v. 196 n. 7, p. 986-993 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a recently discovered parvovirus associated with respiratory tract infections in children. We conducted the first systematic prospective clinical and molecular study using nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) and fecal samples. Methods. NPAs negative for influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, and coronavirus and fecal samples from patients with acute gastroenteritis were included. On the basis of results from a pilot study using 400 NPAs from all age groups, a prospective 12-month study was conducted to detect HBoV in 1200 NPAs and 1435 fecal samples from patients <18 years old by polymerase chain reaction. The complete genome sequences of HBoVs from 12 NPAs and 12 fecal samples were determined. Results. Of the 400 NPAs collected in the pilot study, 20 (5.0%) were found to contain HBoV, all from children <5 years old. In the subsequent prospective study of pediatric patients, HBoV was detected in 83 (6.9%) of 1200 NPAs. Upper and lower respiratory tract infections were equally common. HBoV was detected in 30 (2.1%) of 1435 fecal samples. Fever and watery diarrhea were the most common symptoms. The seasonality of HBoV in NPAs and fecal samples was similar. Codetection with other pathogens occurred in 33% and 56% of NPAs and fecal samples, respectively, from patients with HBoV infection. Genomes of HBoVs from NPAs and fecal samples displayed minimal sequence variations. Conclusions. HBoV was detected in fecal specimens in children with acute gastroenteritis. A single lineage of HBoV was associated with both respiratory tract and enteric infections. © 2007 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57297
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.344
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.000
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, CCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQue, TLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, RAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAuYeung, RKHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, LYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:32:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:32:19Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Infectious Diseases, 2007, v. 196 n. 7, p. 986-993en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-1899en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57297-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a recently discovered parvovirus associated with respiratory tract infections in children. We conducted the first systematic prospective clinical and molecular study using nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) and fecal samples. Methods. NPAs negative for influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, and coronavirus and fecal samples from patients with acute gastroenteritis were included. On the basis of results from a pilot study using 400 NPAs from all age groups, a prospective 12-month study was conducted to detect HBoV in 1200 NPAs and 1435 fecal samples from patients <18 years old by polymerase chain reaction. The complete genome sequences of HBoVs from 12 NPAs and 12 fecal samples were determined. Results. Of the 400 NPAs collected in the pilot study, 20 (5.0%) were found to contain HBoV, all from children <5 years old. In the subsequent prospective study of pediatric patients, HBoV was detected in 83 (6.9%) of 1200 NPAs. Upper and lower respiratory tract infections were equally common. HBoV was detected in 30 (2.1%) of 1435 fecal samples. Fever and watery diarrhea were the most common symptoms. The seasonality of HBoV in NPAs and fecal samples was similar. Codetection with other pathogens occurred in 33% and 56% of NPAs and fecal samples, respectively, from patients with HBoV infection. Genomes of HBoVs from NPAs and fecal samples displayed minimal sequence variations. Conclusions. HBoV was detected in fecal specimens in children with acute gastroenteritis. A single lineage of HBoV was associated with both respiratory tract and enteric infections. © 2007 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jid.oxfordjournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Infectious Diseasesen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Infectious Diseases. Copyright © University of Chicago Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshBocavirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshEpidemiology, Molecularen_HK
dc.subject.meshGastroenteritis - epidemiology - physiopathology - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshParvoviridae Infections - epidemiology - physiopathology - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - virologyen_HK
dc.titleClinical and molecular epidemiology of human bocavirus in respiratory and fecal samples from children in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-1899&volume=196&issue=7&spage=986&epage=993&date=2007&atitle=Clinical+and+molecular+epidemiology+of+human+bocavirus+in+respiratory+and+fecal+samples+from+children+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP: skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, CCY: yipcyril@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, CCY=rp01721en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/521310en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17763318-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35348815516en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros136563-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35348815516&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume196en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage986en_HK
dc.identifier.epage993en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1537-6613-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249572500007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, CCY=14016999800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQue, TL=7003786628en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, RA=7408203830en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAuYeung, RKH=22833521900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, B=7401906727en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, LY=36784797000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, YL=7201403380en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034307en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2878763-

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