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Article: Physiological responses to heat stress on a tropical shore: The benefits of mushrooming behaviour in the limpet Cellana grata

TitlePhysiological responses to heat stress on a tropical shore: The benefits of mushrooming behaviour in the limpet Cellana grata
Authors
KeywordsHeart rate
Heat stress
Hong Kong
Osmoregulation
Summer die-off
Tropical rocky shore
Issue Date2005
PublisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.html
Citation
Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2005, v. 292, p. 213-224 How to Cite?
AbstractSub-lethal responses to heat stress were investigated in the limpet Cellana grata. During summer low tides, foot temperatures were hotter than rock temperatures, but positively correlated with, heart rate, air and rock temperatures. Hotter limpets showed mushrooming behaviour, raising their shell from the rock. Over 30 % of monitored limpets were not relocated during the subsequent daytime low tide. Missing animals were mostly situated on horizontal surfaces, were smaller than those recaptured, and had higher body temperatures, mushrooming heights and heart rates. A laboratory protocol was designed to resemble on-shore thermal stress conditions. Firstly, small and large limpets were held on a hot plate for 60 min and either constrained or allowed to mushroom. Secondly, unconstrained, large animals were held on the hot plate for 120 min. Unconstrained limpets were able to mushroom and had lower foot temperatures but higher heart rates than those constrained, suggesting mushrooming is an active response. Small animals had higher heart rates than large individuals. Mantle water could not be collected from most small, mushrooming limpets but was from constrained animals, and was more concentrated in small limpets. Small and constrained limpets had more concentrated haemolymph than large or mushrooming animals. Mantle and haemolymph osmolalities were positively related, except at high mantle water osmolalities. Smaller animals lost relatively more water, and constrained limpets more than those allowed to mushroom. Large limpets on the hot plate for 120 min showed similar mushrooming heights and heart rates but had hotter foot temperatures, higher haemolymph concentrations, lost all their mantle water and nearly twice as much water than those held for 60 min. Mushrooming behaviour appears to be a short-term, high-risk strategy that allows limpets temporary relief from stressful conditions and may increase their chance of survival until the next tidal immersion. © Inter-Research 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57262
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.554
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDe Pirro, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMorritt, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:31:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:31:09Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series, 2005, v. 292, p. 213-224en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57262-
dc.description.abstractSub-lethal responses to heat stress were investigated in the limpet Cellana grata. During summer low tides, foot temperatures were hotter than rock temperatures, but positively correlated with, heart rate, air and rock temperatures. Hotter limpets showed mushrooming behaviour, raising their shell from the rock. Over 30 % of monitored limpets were not relocated during the subsequent daytime low tide. Missing animals were mostly situated on horizontal surfaces, were smaller than those recaptured, and had higher body temperatures, mushrooming heights and heart rates. A laboratory protocol was designed to resemble on-shore thermal stress conditions. Firstly, small and large limpets were held on a hot plate for 60 min and either constrained or allowed to mushroom. Secondly, unconstrained, large animals were held on the hot plate for 120 min. Unconstrained limpets were able to mushroom and had lower foot temperatures but higher heart rates than those constrained, suggesting mushrooming is an active response. Small animals had higher heart rates than large individuals. Mantle water could not be collected from most small, mushrooming limpets but was from constrained animals, and was more concentrated in small limpets. Small and constrained limpets had more concentrated haemolymph than large or mushrooming animals. Mantle and haemolymph osmolalities were positively related, except at high mantle water osmolalities. Smaller animals lost relatively more water, and constrained limpets more than those allowed to mushroom. Large limpets on the hot plate for 120 min showed similar mushrooming heights and heart rates but had hotter foot temperatures, higher haemolymph concentrations, lost all their mantle water and nearly twice as much water than those held for 60 min. Mushrooming behaviour appears to be a short-term, high-risk strategy that allows limpets temporary relief from stressful conditions and may increase their chance of survival until the next tidal immersion. © Inter-Research 2005.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Ecology Progress Seriesen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsMarine Ecology - Progress Series. Copyright © Inter-Research.en_HK
dc.subjectHeart rateen_HK
dc.subjectHeat stressen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectOsmoregulationen_HK
dc.subjectSummer die-offen_HK
dc.subjectTropical rocky shoreen_HK
dc.titlePhysiological responses to heat stress on a tropical shore: The benefits of mushrooming behaviour in the limpet Cellana grataen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0171-8630&volume=292&spage=213&epage=224&date=2005&atitle=Physiological+responses+to+heat+stress+on+a+tropical+shore:+the+benefits+of+mushrooming+behaviour+in+the+limpet+Cellana+grataen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps292213en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-20444452935en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros97948-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-20444452935&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume292en_HK
dc.identifier.spage213en_HK
dc.identifier.epage224en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229927900019-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Pirro, M=6602987656en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KMY=7401860738en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMorritt, D=7003560499en_HK

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