File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Carbon dynamics of Deep Bay, eastern Pearl River Estuary, China. I: a mass balance budget and implications for shorebird conservation

TitleCarbon dynamics of Deep Bay, eastern Pearl River Estuary, China. I: a mass balance budget and implications for shorebird conservation
Authors
KeywordsBenthos
Hong Kong
Mangroves
Mudflat
Organic pollution
Issue Date1998
PublisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.html
Citation
Marine Ecology - Progress Series, 1998, v. 172, p. 73-87 How to Cite?
AbstractDeep Bay is a shallow embayment (112 km2) in the eastern Pearl River Estuary, China, and comprises 4 major wetland components: (1) a shallow brackish water body of 2.9 m average depth, (2) 2700 ha of intertidal mudflat, (3) 200 ha of tidal mangroves and (4) 300 ha of traditional tidal aquaculture ponds excavated in the mid-to-high intertidal region. A carbon budget is proposed for Deep Bay based on published information on the 4 major landscape components. Despite the usual emphasis placed on the role of mangroves as net carbon exporters in support of consumer (such as shorebird) populations, the carbon budget suggests that about 50% of all carbon available in Deep Bay originates from anthropogenic input from rapidly urbanising, as well as agricultural, areas in the local catchments. Mangrove production only contributes about 1.8% of the total carbon available in Deep Bay. Calculations based on the basal metabolic demands of the bird assemblage in winter suggest that the Deep Bay mudflats are close to carrying capacity. The annual carbon requirements of the shorebirds and availability (as demonstrated by the supply/demand ratio for the curlew) are lowest in the winter months, when bird numbers are large but production low. Considering the shorebird assemblage foraging on the mudflat, the total carbon consumption in January 1994 amounted to 16.9 t, while the carbon production during the same period was 27.8 t. These figures suggest that Deep Bay is near carrying capacity unless >50% of the invertebrate resources are made available to the birds. The results of this study also argue that organic enrichment in Deep Bay, which has usually been regarded as a 'pollutant', forms the basis of the major beneficial use of carbon (shorebird conservation), although further enrichment may result in negative impacts. This study highlights the importance of incorporating human influences into the study of the structure and function of ecosystems in urban settings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57261
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.554
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, MSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:31:07Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:31:07Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology - Progress Series, 1998, v. 172, p. 73-87en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57261-
dc.description.abstractDeep Bay is a shallow embayment (112 km2) in the eastern Pearl River Estuary, China, and comprises 4 major wetland components: (1) a shallow brackish water body of 2.9 m average depth, (2) 2700 ha of intertidal mudflat, (3) 200 ha of tidal mangroves and (4) 300 ha of traditional tidal aquaculture ponds excavated in the mid-to-high intertidal region. A carbon budget is proposed for Deep Bay based on published information on the 4 major landscape components. Despite the usual emphasis placed on the role of mangroves as net carbon exporters in support of consumer (such as shorebird) populations, the carbon budget suggests that about 50% of all carbon available in Deep Bay originates from anthropogenic input from rapidly urbanising, as well as agricultural, areas in the local catchments. Mangrove production only contributes about 1.8% of the total carbon available in Deep Bay. Calculations based on the basal metabolic demands of the bird assemblage in winter suggest that the Deep Bay mudflats are close to carrying capacity. The annual carbon requirements of the shorebirds and availability (as demonstrated by the supply/demand ratio for the curlew) are lowest in the winter months, when bird numbers are large but production low. Considering the shorebird assemblage foraging on the mudflat, the total carbon consumption in January 1994 amounted to 16.9 t, while the carbon production during the same period was 27.8 t. These figures suggest that Deep Bay is near carrying capacity unless >50% of the invertebrate resources are made available to the birds. The results of this study also argue that organic enrichment in Deep Bay, which has usually been regarded as a 'pollutant', forms the basis of the major beneficial use of carbon (shorebird conservation), although further enrichment may result in negative impacts. This study highlights the importance of incorporating human influences into the study of the structure and function of ecosystems in urban settings.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.htmlen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsMarine Ecology - Progress Series. Copyright © Inter-Research.en_HK
dc.subjectBenthosen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectMangrovesen_HK
dc.subjectMudflaten_HK
dc.subjectOrganic pollutionen_HK
dc.titleCarbon dynamics of Deep Bay, eastern Pearl River Estuary, China. I: a mass balance budget and implications for shorebird conservationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0171-8630&volume=172&spage=73&epage=87&date=1998&atitle=Carbon+dynamics+of+Deep+Bay,+eastern+Pearl+River+Estuary,+China.+I:+a+mass+balance+budget+and+implications+for+shorebird+conservationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, SY: swireml@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps172073en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros54174-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000076817000007-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats