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Article: 10 years of the basic law: the rise, retreat and resurgence of judicial power in Hong Kong
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Title10 years of the basic law: the rise, retreat and resurgence of judicial power in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsYap, PJ
 
KeywordsLaw
International law
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherVathek Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.vathek.com/clwr/index.shtml
 
CitationCommon Law World Review, 2007, v. 36 n. 2, p. 166-191 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1350/clwr.2007.36.2.166
 
AbstractSince the National People's Congress Standing Committee's (NPCSC) reversal of the Court of Final Appeal's abrasive decision of Ng Ka Ling, the court has become cognizant of the repercussions of its decisions and has now adopted a pragmatic view toward its adjudicatory role. Where decisions implicate the validity of Mainland Chinese laws or NPCSC decisions, the court would always defer to the central government. Notwithstanding the court's recognition of the supremacy of the NPCSC, the court has remained very diligent in preserving its prerogative as the primary interpreter of the Basic Law. Where disputes concern alleged human rights violations that have no People's Republic of China (PRC) implications but have law and order implications in Hong Kong, the courts are generally conservative so as to afford the legislature or the executive much latitude in maintaining peace and stability. With regard to disputes with neither NPCSC nor domestic law and order implications, the court is confident that any political backlash against an adverse decision would be minimal; in these instances, the court is therefore more conscious of avoiding the austerity of tabulated legalism and is enthused about providing a generous interpretation of the Basic Law.
 
ISSN1473-7795
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1350/clwr.2007.36.2.166
 
SSRN1815883
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorYap, PJ
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:28:11Z
 
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:28:11Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractSince the National People's Congress Standing Committee's (NPCSC) reversal of the Court of Final Appeal's abrasive decision of Ng Ka Ling, the court has become cognizant of the repercussions of its decisions and has now adopted a pragmatic view toward its adjudicatory role. Where decisions implicate the validity of Mainland Chinese laws or NPCSC decisions, the court would always defer to the central government. Notwithstanding the court's recognition of the supremacy of the NPCSC, the court has remained very diligent in preserving its prerogative as the primary interpreter of the Basic Law. Where disputes concern alleged human rights violations that have no People's Republic of China (PRC) implications but have law and order implications in Hong Kong, the courts are generally conservative so as to afford the legislature or the executive much latitude in maintaining peace and stability. With regard to disputes with neither NPCSC nor domestic law and order implications, the court is confident that any political backlash against an adverse decision would be minimal; in these instances, the court is therefore more conscious of avoiding the austerity of tabulated legalism and is enthused about providing a generous interpretation of the Basic Law.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationCommon Law World Review, 2007, v. 36 n. 2, p. 166-191 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1350/clwr.2007.36.2.166
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1350/clwr.2007.36.2.166
 
dc.identifier.epage191
 
dc.identifier.hkuros129043
 
dc.identifier.issn1473-7795
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.spage166
 
dc.identifier.ssrn1815883
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57172
 
dc.identifier.volume36
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherVathek Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.vathek.com/clwr/index.shtml
 
dc.relation.ispartofCommon Law World Review
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectLaw
 
dc.subjectInternational law
 
dc.title10 years of the basic law: the rise, retreat and resurgence of judicial power in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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