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Article: Reaction time performance in ADHD: Improvement under fast-incentive condition and familial effects
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TitleReaction time performance in ADHD: Improvement under fast-incentive condition and familial effects
 
AuthorsAndreou, P2
Neale, BM2
Chen, W2
Christiansen, H5
Gabriels, I
Heise, A3
Meidad, S1
Muller, UC6
Uebel, H3
Banaschewski, T3 4
Manor, I1
Oades, R5
Roeyers, H
Rothenberger, A3
Sham, P2
Steinhausen, HC6
Asherson, P2
Kuntsi, J2
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
 
CitationPsychological Medicine, 2007, v. 37 n. 12, p. 1703-1715 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291707000815
 
AbstractBackground. Reaction time (RT) variability is one of the strongest findings to emerge in cognitive-experimental research of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We set out to confirm the association between ADHD and slow and variable RTs and investigate the degree to which RT performance improves under fast event rate and incentives. Using a group familial correlation approach, we tested the hypothesis that there are shared familial effects on RT performance and ADHD. Method. A total of 144 ADHD combined-type probands, 125 siblings of the ADHD probands and 60 control participants, ages 6-18, performed a four-choice RT task with baseline and fast-incentive conditions. Results. ADHD was associated with slow and variable RTs, and with greater improvement in speed and RT variability from baseline to fast-incentive condition. RT performance showed shared familial influences with ADHD. Under the assumption that the familial effects represent genetic influences, the proportion of the phenotypic correlation due to shared familial influences was estimated as 60-70%. Conclusions. The data are inconsistent with models that consider RT variability as reflecting a stable cognitive deficit in ADHD, but instead emphasize the extent to which energetic or motivational factors can have a greater effect on RT performance in ADHD. The findings support the role of RT variability as an endophenotype mediating the link between genes and ADHD. © 2007 Cambridge University Press.
 
ISSN0033-2917
2013 Impact Factor: 5.428
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291707000815
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000251887600003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorAndreou, P
 
dc.contributor.authorNeale, BM
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, W
 
dc.contributor.authorChristiansen, H
 
dc.contributor.authorGabriels, I
 
dc.contributor.authorHeise, A
 
dc.contributor.authorMeidad, S
 
dc.contributor.authorMuller, UC
 
dc.contributor.authorUebel, H
 
dc.contributor.authorBanaschewski, T
 
dc.contributor.authorManor, I
 
dc.contributor.authorOades, R
 
dc.contributor.authorRoeyers, H
 
dc.contributor.authorRothenberger, A
 
dc.contributor.authorSham, P
 
dc.contributor.authorSteinhausen, HC
 
dc.contributor.authorAsherson, P
 
dc.contributor.authorKuntsi, J
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:27:37Z
 
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:27:37Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractBackground. Reaction time (RT) variability is one of the strongest findings to emerge in cognitive-experimental research of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We set out to confirm the association between ADHD and slow and variable RTs and investigate the degree to which RT performance improves under fast event rate and incentives. Using a group familial correlation approach, we tested the hypothesis that there are shared familial effects on RT performance and ADHD. Method. A total of 144 ADHD combined-type probands, 125 siblings of the ADHD probands and 60 control participants, ages 6-18, performed a four-choice RT task with baseline and fast-incentive conditions. Results. ADHD was associated with slow and variable RTs, and with greater improvement in speed and RT variability from baseline to fast-incentive condition. RT performance showed shared familial influences with ADHD. Under the assumption that the familial effects represent genetic influences, the proportion of the phenotypic correlation due to shared familial influences was estimated as 60-70%. Conclusions. The data are inconsistent with models that consider RT variability as reflecting a stable cognitive deficit in ADHD, but instead emphasize the extent to which energetic or motivational factors can have a greater effect on RT performance in ADHD. The findings support the role of RT variability as an endophenotype mediating the link between genes and ADHD. © 2007 Cambridge University Press.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2007, v. 37 n. 12, p. 1703-1715 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291707000815
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9933955
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291707000815
 
dc.identifier.epage1715
 
dc.identifier.hkuros151600
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251887600003
 
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917
2013 Impact Factor: 5.428
 
dc.identifier.issue12
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid17537284
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-36048957548
 
dc.identifier.spage1703
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57157
 
dc.identifier.volume37
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsPsychological Medicine. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAttention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - genetics -
 
dc.subject.meshMotivation
 
dc.subject.meshReaction Time - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshModels, Genetic
 
dc.titleReaction time performance in ADHD: Improvement under fast-incentive condition and familial effects
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Geha Mental Health Center
  2. King's College London
  3. Universität Göttingen
  4. Zentralinstitut für Seelische Gesundheit
  5. Rheinische Kliniken Essen
  6. Universität Zürich