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Article: A community study on the relationship between stress, coping, affective dispositions and periodontal attachment loss

TitleA community study on the relationship between stress, coping, affective dispositions and periodontal attachment loss
Authors
KeywordsCoping
Periodontal disease
Psychology
Stress
Trait
Issue Date2006
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COM
Citation
Community Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology, 2006, v. 34 n. 4, p. 252-266 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Psychological factors may increase the risk for periodontal diseases. Contemporary conceptualization of the stress process supports the evaluation of stress at three levels: stressors, moderating and mediating factors, and stress reactions. Objective: This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship of periodontal disease in terms of clinical attachment level (CAL) to psychosocial stress, making reference to the major components of stress process. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 1000 subjects aged 25-64 years in Hong Kong was conducted. Subjects were asked to complete a set of questionnaires measuring stressors including changes, significant life event and daily strains, stress reactions including physiological and affective responses, and coping and affective dispositions. CAL was assessed. Results: Individuals with high mean CAL values had higher scores on the job and financial strain scales than periodontally healthy individuals (P < 0.05), after adjusting for age, gender, cigarette smoking and systemic disease. Depression, anxiety trait, depression trait, problem-focused coping, and emotion-focused coping were also related to CAL. Logistic regression analysis indicated that all these factors were significant risk indicators for periodontal attachment loss, except problem-focused coping, which reduced the odds of CAL. Individuals who were high emotion-focused copers, low problem-focused copers, trait anxious, or trait depressive had a higher odds of more severe CAL. Conclusion: Chronic job and financial strains, depression, inadequate coping, and maladaptive trait dispositions are significant risk indicators for periodontal attachment loss. Adequate coping and adaptive trait dispositions, evidenced as high problem-focused coping and low anxiety/ depression trait, may reduce the stress-associated odds. © Blackwell Munksgaard, 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/55441
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.233
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.111
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, SKSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-06T03:37:35Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-06T03:37:35Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCommunity Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology, 2006, v. 34 n. 4, p. 252-266en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0301-5661en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/55441-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Psychological factors may increase the risk for periodontal diseases. Contemporary conceptualization of the stress process supports the evaluation of stress at three levels: stressors, moderating and mediating factors, and stress reactions. Objective: This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship of periodontal disease in terms of clinical attachment level (CAL) to psychosocial stress, making reference to the major components of stress process. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 1000 subjects aged 25-64 years in Hong Kong was conducted. Subjects were asked to complete a set of questionnaires measuring stressors including changes, significant life event and daily strains, stress reactions including physiological and affective responses, and coping and affective dispositions. CAL was assessed. Results: Individuals with high mean CAL values had higher scores on the job and financial strain scales than periodontally healthy individuals (P < 0.05), after adjusting for age, gender, cigarette smoking and systemic disease. Depression, anxiety trait, depression trait, problem-focused coping, and emotion-focused coping were also related to CAL. Logistic regression analysis indicated that all these factors were significant risk indicators for periodontal attachment loss, except problem-focused coping, which reduced the odds of CAL. Individuals who were high emotion-focused copers, low problem-focused copers, trait anxious, or trait depressive had a higher odds of more severe CAL. Conclusion: Chronic job and financial strains, depression, inadequate coping, and maladaptive trait dispositions are significant risk indicators for periodontal attachment loss. Adequate coping and adaptive trait dispositions, evidenced as high problem-focused coping and low anxiety/ depression trait, may reduce the stress-associated odds. © Blackwell Munksgaard, 2006.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COMen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCopingen_HK
dc.subjectPeriodontal diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectPsychologyen_HK
dc.subjectStressen_HK
dc.subjectTraiten_HK
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Attachment Loss - etiology - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - complicationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshPsychological Testsen_HK
dc.titleA community study on the relationship between stress, coping, affective dispositions and periodontal attachment lossen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0301-5661&volume=34&issue=4&spage=252&epage=266&date=2006&atitle=A+community+study+on+the+relationship+between+stress,+coping,+affective+dispositions+and+periodontal+attachment+lossen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, WK:ewkleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, WK=rp00019en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0528.2006.00282.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16856946-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745684190en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros116979-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745684190&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume34en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage252en_HK
dc.identifier.epage266en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238743400002-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, SKS=26021423300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, WK=25224691800en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike739353-

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