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Article: Exploring childhood immunization uptake with first nations mothers in north-western Ontario, Canada

TitleExploring childhood immunization uptake with first nations mothers in north-western Ontario, Canada
Authors
KeywordsChildhood immunizations
First Nations
Public health nursing
Qualitative research
Uptake
Vaccinations
Issue Date2003
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/
Citation
Journal Of Advanced Nursing, 2003, v. 41 n. 1, p. 63-72 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Childhood immunization is an important component of preventive health care for young children. Successful control of vaccine-preventable diseases depends on high levels of immunization coverage. Immunization statistics show that on-reserve First Nations (Native Indian) children have lower vaccination coverage than children in the general Canadian population. There has been little research, however, conducted with First Nations populations on this topic. Aim of the study. This study explored First Nations parents' beliefs about childhood immunizations and examined factors influencing immunization uptake. Methods. This study used a qualitative descriptive design to explore the issue of childhood immunization uptake. Twenty-eight mothers from two First Nations communities in north-western Ontario, Canada, were interviewed about their perceptions of childhood immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases. The interviews were transcribed and content analysis was used to examine the data. Findings. Data analysis revealed the following six themes: (1) the fear of disease; (2) the efficacy of immunizations; (3) the immunization experience; (4) the consequences of immunization; (5) interactions with health professionals; and (6) barriers to immunizations. Participants were motivated to seek immunizations for their children by a fear of vaccine preventable diseases. A small proportion of mothers, however, questioned the effectiveness of vaccines in preventing disease. Traumatic immunization experiences, vaccine side-effects and sequelae, negative interactions with health professionals, and barriers such as time constraints and childhood illnesses all served as deterrents to immunization. Conclusions. The research outcomes highlight the varied beliefs of First Nations parents about childhood immunizations and the numerous factors that both positively and negatively influence immunization uptake. Further research is needed to explore the issue of childhood immunizations in First Nations communities and to determine strategies to improve uptake.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/54325
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.010
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:43:22Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:43:22Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Advanced Nursing, 2003, v. 41 n. 1, p. 63-72en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/54325-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Childhood immunization is an important component of preventive health care for young children. Successful control of vaccine-preventable diseases depends on high levels of immunization coverage. Immunization statistics show that on-reserve First Nations (Native Indian) children have lower vaccination coverage than children in the general Canadian population. There has been little research, however, conducted with First Nations populations on this topic. Aim of the study. This study explored First Nations parents' beliefs about childhood immunizations and examined factors influencing immunization uptake. Methods. This study used a qualitative descriptive design to explore the issue of childhood immunization uptake. Twenty-eight mothers from two First Nations communities in north-western Ontario, Canada, were interviewed about their perceptions of childhood immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases. The interviews were transcribed and content analysis was used to examine the data. Findings. Data analysis revealed the following six themes: (1) the fear of disease; (2) the efficacy of immunizations; (3) the immunization experience; (4) the consequences of immunization; (5) interactions with health professionals; and (6) barriers to immunizations. Participants were motivated to seek immunizations for their children by a fear of vaccine preventable diseases. A small proportion of mothers, however, questioned the effectiveness of vaccines in preventing disease. Traumatic immunization experiences, vaccine side-effects and sequelae, negative interactions with health professionals, and barriers such as time constraints and childhood illnesses all served as deterrents to immunization. Conclusions. The research outcomes highlight the varied beliefs of First Nations parents about childhood immunizations and the numerous factors that both positively and negatively influence immunization uptake. Further research is needed to explore the issue of childhood immunizations in First Nations communities and to determine strategies to improve uptake.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalofadvancednursing.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Advanced Nursingen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Advanced Nursing. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen_HK
dc.subjectChildhood immunizationsen_HK
dc.subjectFirst Nationsen_HK
dc.subjectPublic health nursingen_HK
dc.subjectQualitative researchen_HK
dc.subjectUptakeen_HK
dc.subjectVaccinationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshImmunization/psychology - utilizationen_HK
dc.subject.meshIndians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshMothers - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshOntario - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.titleExploring childhood immunization uptake with first nations mothers in north-western Ontario, Canadaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0309-2402&volume=41&issue=1&spage=63&epage=72&date=2003&atitle=Exploring+childhood+immunization+uptake+with+First+Nations+mothers+in+north-western+Ontario,+Canadaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTarrant, M: tarrantm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTarrant, M=rp00461en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2648.2003.02507.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12519289-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037268302en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros75653-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037268302&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume41en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage63en_HK
dc.identifier.epage72en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000180353500015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTarrant, M=7004340118en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGregory, D=7201783645en_HK

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