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Article: Parity and the metabolic syndrome in older Chinese women: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitleParity and the metabolic syndrome in older Chinese women: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 2006, v. 65 n. 4, p. 460-469 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To examine whether parity or gravidity contributes to the development of the metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods: The first phase of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study recruited 7352 women and 3065 men aged 50-93 years in 2003-4. Data on the number of live births and pregnancies, other reproduction-associated factors and socioeconomic and lifestyles factors were collected by standardized interview. The MS components were determined through physical examination and measurement of fasting blood samples. MS was identified if waist circumference was ≥ 90 cm for men or ≥ 80 cm for women, plus any two of: (a) raised triglyceride (TG) level (1·7 mmol/l) or specific treatment for this lipid abnormality; (b) reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (< 1·03 mmol/l in males or < 1·29 mmol/l in females) or specific treatment for this lipid abnormality; (c) raised blood pressure (BP, systolic BP ≥ 130 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥ 85 mmHg) or hypertension therapy; and (d) raised fasting glucose (≥ 5·6 mmol/l) or previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Results: Before adjustment for potential confounders, we found associations between the number of births and lifestyle and socioeconomic factors in both sexes. However, in women, but not in men, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio, triglyceride and glucose were positively associated with the number of birth after adjusting for a range of potential confounders. The age-adjusted prevalence of the MS increased with the number of births and pregnancies in women, but the gradient for birth was steeper than that for pregnancies [odds ratio change per birth 1·16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·11-1·22, P < 0·001; odds ratio change per pregnancy 1·11, 95% CI 1·06-1·16, P < 0·001], although attenuating the association adjustment did not affect the significance of these findings. There was no association in men with regard to the number of their partners' live births given the same analysis and similar shared living background with the women. Conclusion: Higher parity or gravidity was associated with a consistent increase in the risk of MS in Chinese women. As the association persisted after adjustment for lifestyle factors and there was no association between the risk of MS and the number of births associated with the partners of the males, the association in women may represent a biological response to pregnancy. © 2006 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/54274
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.314
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLao, XQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYin, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorHeys, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAdab, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:41:50Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:41:50Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 2006, v. 65 n. 4, p. 460-469en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/54274-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine whether parity or gravidity contributes to the development of the metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods: The first phase of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study recruited 7352 women and 3065 men aged 50-93 years in 2003-4. Data on the number of live births and pregnancies, other reproduction-associated factors and socioeconomic and lifestyles factors were collected by standardized interview. The MS components were determined through physical examination and measurement of fasting blood samples. MS was identified if waist circumference was ≥ 90 cm for men or ≥ 80 cm for women, plus any two of: (a) raised triglyceride (TG) level (1·7 mmol/l) or specific treatment for this lipid abnormality; (b) reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (< 1·03 mmol/l in males or < 1·29 mmol/l in females) or specific treatment for this lipid abnormality; (c) raised blood pressure (BP, systolic BP ≥ 130 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥ 85 mmHg) or hypertension therapy; and (d) raised fasting glucose (≥ 5·6 mmol/l) or previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Results: Before adjustment for potential confounders, we found associations between the number of births and lifestyle and socioeconomic factors in both sexes. However, in women, but not in men, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio, triglyceride and glucose were positively associated with the number of birth after adjusting for a range of potential confounders. The age-adjusted prevalence of the MS increased with the number of births and pregnancies in women, but the gradient for birth was steeper than that for pregnancies [odds ratio change per birth 1·16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·11-1·22, P < 0·001; odds ratio change per pregnancy 1·11, 95% CI 1·06-1·16, P < 0·001], although attenuating the association adjustment did not affect the significance of these findings. There was no association in men with regard to the number of their partners' live births given the same analysis and similar shared living background with the women. Conclusion: Higher parity or gravidity was associated with a consistent increase in the risk of MS in Chinese women. As the association persisted after adjustment for lifestyle factors and there was no association between the risk of MS and the number of births associated with the partners of the males, the association in women may represent a biological response to pregnancy. © 2006 The Authors.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsClinical Endocrinology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen_HK
dc.subject.meshAbortion, Spontaneousen_HK
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshParityen_HK
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen_HK
dc.titleParity and the metabolic syndrome in older Chinese women: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-0664&volume=65&issue=4&spage=460&epage=469&date=2006&atitle=Parity+and+the+metabolic+syndrome+in+older+Chinese+women:+The+Guangzhou+Biobank+cohort+Studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, M: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHeys, M: m_heys@lycos.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, M=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHeys, M=rp00257en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2265.2006.02615.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16984238-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748791190en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros121615-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748791190&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume65en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage460en_HK
dc.identifier.epage469en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240602900008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, XQ=14031637000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=24464616400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYin, P=14623527300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, M=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeys, M=22234232400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAdab, P=6601949045en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike862888-

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