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Conference Paper: Bold signal changes of the visual cortex on stimulation of the vision-related acupoints

TitleBold signal changes of the visual cortex on stimulation of the vision-related acupoints
Authors
KeywordsfMRI
acupucture
visual activation
neural responses
Issue Date2002
PublisherSociety for Neuroscience. The Journal's web site is located at http://sfn.scholarone.com/
Citation
Neuroscience 2002, Orlando, FL, 3-7 November 2002, Presentation no. 658.20 How to Cite?
AbstractWe verified Cho and his colleagues' acupoints using conventional acupuncture and electro-acupuncture. Acupuncture was performed with two different techniques - conventional and electro-acupuncture. Functional MR imaging (fMRI) was performed using a 1.5 T MR scanner with standard scan parameters in 13 healthy volunteers. The 30-second activation period was alternated by 30-second rest period. First, the fMRI was performed with visual activation using light-emitting diodes (LED) flashing with a frequency of 8 Hz. The fMRI was then repeated with conventional acupuncture and electro-acupuncture at the following acupoints (BL60, BL 65, BL 66 and BL 67) located in the lateral aspect of the foot. The activated pixels in the visual cortex created by visual activation correlate well with those created by both conventional acupuncture and electro-acupuncture Fig. 1. The results obtained by conventional acupuncture stimulation have relatively more neural responses due to other types of stimulation rather than visual activation. The neural responses obtained by electro-acupuncture at 2 Hz was found to be stronger than those obtained by electro-acupuncture at 64 Hz. The greatest difficulty encountered by the researchers is that only 25 to 30% of the subjects undergoing acupuncture renders expected neural response. Supported by The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust and The Hong Kong University Foundation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/54078

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, RTFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMa, QYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, ESen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:36:08Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:36:08Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuroscience 2002, Orlando, FL, 3-7 November 2002, Presentation no. 658.20en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/54078-
dc.description.abstractWe verified Cho and his colleagues' acupoints using conventional acupuncture and electro-acupuncture. Acupuncture was performed with two different techniques - conventional and electro-acupuncture. Functional MR imaging (fMRI) was performed using a 1.5 T MR scanner with standard scan parameters in 13 healthy volunteers. The 30-second activation period was alternated by 30-second rest period. First, the fMRI was performed with visual activation using light-emitting diodes (LED) flashing with a frequency of 8 Hz. The fMRI was then repeated with conventional acupuncture and electro-acupuncture at the following acupoints (BL60, BL 65, BL 66 and BL 67) located in the lateral aspect of the foot. The activated pixels in the visual cortex created by visual activation correlate well with those created by both conventional acupuncture and electro-acupuncture Fig. 1. The results obtained by conventional acupuncture stimulation have relatively more neural responses due to other types of stimulation rather than visual activation. The neural responses obtained by electro-acupuncture at 2 Hz was found to be stronger than those obtained by electro-acupuncture at 64 Hz. The greatest difficulty encountered by the researchers is that only 25 to 30% of the subjects undergoing acupuncture renders expected neural response. Supported by The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust and The Hong Kong University Foundation.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscience. The Journal's web site is located at http://sfn.scholarone.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSociety for Neuroscience Annual Meeting-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsSociety for Neuroscience Abstract viewer & itinerary planner. Copyright © Society for Neuroscience.en_HK
dc.subjectfMRI-
dc.subjectacupucture-
dc.subjectvisual activation-
dc.subjectneural responses-
dc.titleBold signal changes of the visual cortex on stimulation of the vision-related acupointsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, RTF: rtcheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMa, QY: qyma@eee.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYang, ES: esyang@eee.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115181-

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