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Article: The effect of demineralized bone matrix on the healing of intramembranous bone grafts in rabbit skull defects

TitleThe effect of demineralized bone matrix on the healing of intramembranous bone grafts in rabbit skull defects
Authors
KeywordsDemineralized bone matrix
Endochondral ossification
Intramembranous bone graft
Intramembranous ossification
Issue Date1996
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
Journal Of Dental Research, 1996, v. 75 n. 4, p. 1045-1051 How to Cite?
AbstractA clinical dilemma exists regarding the type of bone that should be used to replace diseased or traumatized osseous tissue. Oral, plastic, and orthopedic surgeons normally implant viable mineralized endochondral (EC) autografts or demineralized EC allografts. A few clinicians have recognized the disadvantages of using EC bone in craniofacial surgery and advocated the replacement of intramembranous (IM) bone with healthy IM bone. However, controversy and uncertainty surround our understanding of these matrices to induce bone formation. Recent studies have advocated the use of other materials with osteoinductive properties, such as demineralized bone matrix (DBM). The proposed delivery system used in this study included IM bone grafts, DBM, and fixation of the IM bone graft. The purpose of this work was to gain further insights into the mechanism of healing of IM bone, in both the presence and the absence of DBM, and to compare the healing of IM bone grafts with that of DBM alone. Critical-sized (10 × 5 mm), full-thickness bony defects in rabbit parietal bone, devoid of periosteum, were filled with IM bone graft (mandible) alone, demineralized cortical bone matrix (DBM) alone, or combined DBM-IM bone graft, or were left unfilled. Histologic changes were examined 14 days later. The IM bone graft healed through IM ossification with no intermediate cartilage stage. DBM and composite DBM-IM healed through an EC ossification with an intermediate cartilage stage. It is hypothesized that the role of the IM graft is to induce neovascularization into the defect site, and that the undifferentiated mesenchymal cells in the perivascular region of the new blood vessels are induced by the bone morphogenetic protein(s) in the DBM into bone-forming cells.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53994
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRabie, ABMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDeng, YMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamman, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHägg, Uen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:33:53Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:33:53Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Dental Research, 1996, v. 75 n. 4, p. 1045-1051en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53994-
dc.description.abstractA clinical dilemma exists regarding the type of bone that should be used to replace diseased or traumatized osseous tissue. Oral, plastic, and orthopedic surgeons normally implant viable mineralized endochondral (EC) autografts or demineralized EC allografts. A few clinicians have recognized the disadvantages of using EC bone in craniofacial surgery and advocated the replacement of intramembranous (IM) bone with healthy IM bone. However, controversy and uncertainty surround our understanding of these matrices to induce bone formation. Recent studies have advocated the use of other materials with osteoinductive properties, such as demineralized bone matrix (DBM). The proposed delivery system used in this study included IM bone grafts, DBM, and fixation of the IM bone graft. The purpose of this work was to gain further insights into the mechanism of healing of IM bone, in both the presence and the absence of DBM, and to compare the healing of IM bone grafts with that of DBM alone. Critical-sized (10 × 5 mm), full-thickness bony defects in rabbit parietal bone, devoid of periosteum, were filled with IM bone graft (mandible) alone, demineralized cortical bone matrix (DBM) alone, or combined DBM-IM bone graft, or were left unfilled. Histologic changes were examined 14 days later. The IM bone graft healed through IM ossification with no intermediate cartilage stage. DBM and composite DBM-IM healed through an EC ossification with an intermediate cartilage stage. It is hypothesized that the role of the IM graft is to induce neovascularization into the defect site, and that the undifferentiated mesenchymal cells in the perivascular region of the new blood vessels are induced by the bone morphogenetic protein(s) in the DBM into bone-forming cells.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectDemineralized bone matrixen_HK
dc.subjectEndochondral ossificationen_HK
dc.subjectIntramembranous bone graften_HK
dc.subjectIntramembranous ossificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBone Demineralization Techniqueen_HK
dc.subject.meshBone Matrix - anatomy & histology - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBone Transplantation - methods - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHistological Techniquesen_HK
dc.subject.meshRabbitsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSkull - anatomy & histology - physiology - surgeryen_HK
dc.subject.meshWound Healing - physiologyen_HK
dc.titleThe effect of demineralized bone matrix on the healing of intramembranous bone grafts in rabbit skull defectsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-0345&volume=75&issue=4&spage=1045&epage=1051&date=1996&atitle=The+effect+of+demineralized+bone+matrix+on+the+healing+of+intramembranous+bone+grafts+in+rabbit+skull+defectsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailRabie, ABM: rabie@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamman, N: nsamman@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHägg, U: euohagg@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityRabie, ABM=rp00029en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamman, N=rp00021en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHägg, U=rp00020en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid8708134-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030307268en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros11876-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030307268&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume75en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1045en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1051en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996VA15800016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRabie, ABM=7007172734en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeng, YM=55459373300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamman, N=7006413627en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHägg, U=7006790279en_HK

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