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Article: Stopping drinking and risk of oesophageal cancer

TitleStopping drinking and risk of oesophageal cancer
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bmj.com/
Citation
British Medical Journal, 1995, v. 310 n. 6987, p. 1094-1097 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective - To examine the effect of stopping drinking on the risk of oesophageal cancer. Design - Hospital based case-control study. Setting - Surgical departments of four district general hospitals and general practices in Hong Kong. Subjects - Cases were 400 consecutive admissions of patients with histologically confirmed diagnosis of oesophageal cancer during a 21 month period in 1989-90 (87% response rate). Controls were 1598 patients selected from the same surgical departments as the cases and from the general practices from which the cases were originally referred (95% response rate). Main outcome measure - Relative risk of developing oesophageal cancer after stopping drinking (adjusted for age, education, place of birth, smoking, and diet). Results - Current light drinking (< 200 g ethanol/week) was not associated with significant increase in risk. Among former drinkers risk fell more quickly in moderate (200-599 g/week) than heavy (≥ 600 g/week) drinkers. Even among heavy drinkers, however, risk had dropped substantially after five to nine years of not drinking. The results suggest that the time taken for risk to return to that in subjects who never drink was 10-14 years for moderate drinkers and 15 years or more, if ever, for heavy drinkers. Conclusion - Risk of oesophageal cancer decreases fairly rapidly with time after abstaining from drinking. This new finding could be used in health promotion to encourage behavioural changes, especially in heavy drinkers, who have a very high risk of developing oesophageal cancer. It also suggests that alcoholic beverages have a strong effect on the late stage of carcinogenesis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53538
ISSN
2008 Impact Factor: 12.827
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.567
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, SWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDay, NEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, SFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBadrinath, Pen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:22:38Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:22:38Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Medical Journal, 1995, v. 310 n. 6987, p. 1094-1097en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0959-8146en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53538-
dc.description.abstractObjective - To examine the effect of stopping drinking on the risk of oesophageal cancer. Design - Hospital based case-control study. Setting - Surgical departments of four district general hospitals and general practices in Hong Kong. Subjects - Cases were 400 consecutive admissions of patients with histologically confirmed diagnosis of oesophageal cancer during a 21 month period in 1989-90 (87% response rate). Controls were 1598 patients selected from the same surgical departments as the cases and from the general practices from which the cases were originally referred (95% response rate). Main outcome measure - Relative risk of developing oesophageal cancer after stopping drinking (adjusted for age, education, place of birth, smoking, and diet). Results - Current light drinking (< 200 g ethanol/week) was not associated with significant increase in risk. Among former drinkers risk fell more quickly in moderate (200-599 g/week) than heavy (≥ 600 g/week) drinkers. Even among heavy drinkers, however, risk had dropped substantially after five to nine years of not drinking. The results suggest that the time taken for risk to return to that in subjects who never drink was 10-14 years for moderate drinkers and 15 years or more, if ever, for heavy drinkers. Conclusion - Risk of oesophageal cancer decreases fairly rapidly with time after abstaining from drinking. This new finding could be used in health promotion to encourage behavioural changes, especially in heavy drinkers, who have a very high risk of developing oesophageal cancer. It also suggests that alcoholic beverages have a strong effect on the late stage of carcinogenesis.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bmj.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Medical Journalen_HK
dc.rightsB M J. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinoma - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAlcohol drinking - adverse effects - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, squamous cell - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEsophageal neoplasms - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.titleStopping drinking and risk of oesophageal canceren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0959-535X&volume=310&issue=6987&spage=1094&epage=1097&date=1995&atitle=Stopping+drinking+and+risk+of+oesophageal+canceren_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid7742674-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2549497-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028985747en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros1120-
dc.identifier.volume310en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6987en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1094en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1097en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995QW61800013-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDuffy, SW=24427029200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDay, NE=36072228700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, SF=19233745400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBadrinath, P=7003836984en_HK

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