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Article: Dietary intake and practices in the Hong Kong Chinese population

TitleDietary intake and practices in the Hong Kong Chinese population
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 1998, v. 52 n. 10, p. 631-637 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives - To examine dietary intake and practices of the adult Hong Kong Chinese population to provide a basis for future public health recommendations with regard to prevention of certain chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and osteoporosis. Participants - Age and sex stratified random sample of the Hong Kong Chinese population aged 25 to 74 years (500 men, 510 women). Method - A food frequency method over a one week period was used for nutrient quantification, and a separate questionnaire was used for assessment of dietary habits. Information was obtained by interview. Results - Men had higher intakes of energy and higher nutrient density of vitamin D, monounsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol, but lower nutrient density of protein, many vitamins, calcium, iron, copper, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. There was an age related decrease in energy intake and other nutrients except for vitamin C, sodium, potassium, and percentage of total calorie from carbohydrate, which all increased with age. Approximately 50% of the population had a cholesterol intake of ≤ 300 mg; 60% had a fat intake ≤ 30% of total energy; and 85% had a percentage of energy from saturated fats ≤ 10%; criteria considered desirable for cardiovascular health. Seventy eight per cent of the population had sodium intake values in the range shown to be associated with the age related rise in blood pressure with age. Mean calcium intake was lower than the FAO/WHO recommendations. The awareness of the value of wholemeal bread and polyunsaturated fat spreads was lower in this population compared with that in Australia. There was a marked difference in types of cooking oil compared with Singaporeans, the latter using more coconut/palm/mixed vegetable oils. Conclusions - Although the current intake pattern for cardiovascular health for fat, saturated fatty acid, and cholesterol fall within the recommended range for over 50% of the population, follow up surveys to monitor the pattern would be needed. Decreasing salt consumption, increasing calcium intake, and increasing the awareness of the health value of fibre may all be beneficial in the context of chronic disease prevention.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53537
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:22:37Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:22:37Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 1998, v. 52 n. 10, p. 631-637en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53537-
dc.description.abstractObjectives - To examine dietary intake and practices of the adult Hong Kong Chinese population to provide a basis for future public health recommendations with regard to prevention of certain chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and osteoporosis. Participants - Age and sex stratified random sample of the Hong Kong Chinese population aged 25 to 74 years (500 men, 510 women). Method - A food frequency method over a one week period was used for nutrient quantification, and a separate questionnaire was used for assessment of dietary habits. Information was obtained by interview. Results - Men had higher intakes of energy and higher nutrient density of vitamin D, monounsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol, but lower nutrient density of protein, many vitamins, calcium, iron, copper, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. There was an age related decrease in energy intake and other nutrients except for vitamin C, sodium, potassium, and percentage of total calorie from carbohydrate, which all increased with age. Approximately 50% of the population had a cholesterol intake of ≤ 300 mg; 60% had a fat intake ≤ 30% of total energy; and 85% had a percentage of energy from saturated fats ≤ 10%; criteria considered desirable for cardiovascular health. Seventy eight per cent of the population had sodium intake values in the range shown to be associated with the age related rise in blood pressure with age. Mean calcium intake was lower than the FAO/WHO recommendations. The awareness of the value of wholemeal bread and polyunsaturated fat spreads was lower in this population compared with that in Australia. There was a marked difference in types of cooking oil compared with Singaporeans, the latter using more coconut/palm/mixed vegetable oils. Conclusions - Although the current intake pattern for cardiovascular health for fat, saturated fatty acid, and cholesterol fall within the recommended range for over 50% of the population, follow up surveys to monitor the pattern would be needed. Decreasing salt consumption, increasing calcium intake, and increasing the awareness of the health value of fibre may all be beneficial in the context of chronic disease prevention.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.en_HK
dc.subject.meshDieten_HK
dc.subject.meshFood habits - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHypertension - epidemiology - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshOsteoporosis - epidemiology - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshPotassium, dietary - administration & dosageen_HK
dc.titleDietary intake and practices in the Hong Kong Chinese populationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0143-005X&volume=52&issue=10&spage=631&epage=637&date=1998&atitle=Dietary+intake+and+practices+in+the+Hong+Kong+Chinese+populationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid10023462-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1756630-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031693189en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros39105-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031693189&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume52en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage631en_HK
dc.identifier.epage637en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000076225500012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, J=36040369400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, SSF=7202044842en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SC=7403716908en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK

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