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Article: A tale of two cities: Community psychobehavioral surveillance and related impact on outbreak control in Hong Kong and Singapore during the severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic

TitleA tale of two cities: Community psychobehavioral surveillance and related impact on outbreak control in Hong Kong and Singapore during the severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherUniversity of Chicago Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/ICHE/home.html
Citation
Infection Control And Hospital Epidemiology, 2004, v. 25 n. 12, p. 1033-1041 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To compare the public's knowledge and perception of SARS and the extent to which various precautionary measures were adopted in Hong Kong and Singapore. DESIGN: Cross-sectional telephone survey of 705 Hong Kong and 1,201 Singapore adults selected by random-digit dialing. RESULTS: Hong Kong respondents had significantly higher anxiety than Singapore respondents (State Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI] score, 2.06 vs 1.77; P < .001). The former group also reported more frequent headaches, difficulty breathing, dizziness, rhinorrhea, and sore throat. More than 90% in both cities were willing to be quarantined if they had close contact with a SARS case, and 70% or more would be compliant for social contacts. Most respondents (86.7% in Hong Kong vs 71.4% in Singapore; P < .001) knew that SARS could be transmitted via respiratory droplets, although fewer (75.8% in Hong Kong vs 62.1% in Singapore; P < .001) knew that fomites were also a possible transmission source. Twenty-three percent of Hong Kong and 11.9% of Singapore respondents believed that they were "very likely" or "somewhat likely" to contract SARS during the current outbreak (P < .001). There were large differences between Hong Kong and Singapore in the adoption of personal precautionary measures. Respondents with higher levels of anxiety, better knowledge about SARS, and greater risk perceptions were more likely to take comprehensive precautionary measures against the infection, as were older, female, and more educated individuals. CONCLUSION: Comparative psychobehavioral surveillance and analysis could yield important insights into generic versus population-specific issues that could be used to inform, design, and evaluate public health infection control policy measures.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53536
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.669
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.985
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQuah, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, HPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:22:35Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:22:35Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInfection Control And Hospital Epidemiology, 2004, v. 25 n. 12, p. 1033-1041en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0899-823Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53536-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To compare the public's knowledge and perception of SARS and the extent to which various precautionary measures were adopted in Hong Kong and Singapore. DESIGN: Cross-sectional telephone survey of 705 Hong Kong and 1,201 Singapore adults selected by random-digit dialing. RESULTS: Hong Kong respondents had significantly higher anxiety than Singapore respondents (State Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI] score, 2.06 vs 1.77; P < .001). The former group also reported more frequent headaches, difficulty breathing, dizziness, rhinorrhea, and sore throat. More than 90% in both cities were willing to be quarantined if they had close contact with a SARS case, and 70% or more would be compliant for social contacts. Most respondents (86.7% in Hong Kong vs 71.4% in Singapore; P < .001) knew that SARS could be transmitted via respiratory droplets, although fewer (75.8% in Hong Kong vs 62.1% in Singapore; P < .001) knew that fomites were also a possible transmission source. Twenty-three percent of Hong Kong and 11.9% of Singapore respondents believed that they were "very likely" or "somewhat likely" to contract SARS during the current outbreak (P < .001). There were large differences between Hong Kong and Singapore in the adoption of personal precautionary measures. Respondents with higher levels of anxiety, better knowledge about SARS, and greater risk perceptions were more likely to take comprehensive precautionary measures against the infection, as were older, female, and more educated individuals. CONCLUSION: Comparative psychobehavioral surveillance and analysis could yield important insights into generic versus population-specific issues that could be used to inform, design, and evaluate public health infection control policy measures.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/ICHE/home.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsInfection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. Copyright © University of Chicago Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_HK
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillanceen_HK
dc.subject.meshPublic Opinionen_HK
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.titleA tale of two cities: Community psychobehavioral surveillance and related impact on outbreak control in Hong Kong and Singapore during the severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemicen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0899-823X&volume=25&issue=12&spage=1033&epage=1041&date=2004&atitle=A+tale+of+two+cities:+community+psychobehavioral+surveillance+and+related+impact+on+outbreak+control+in+Hong+Kong+and+Singapore+during+the+severe+acute+respiratory+syndrome+epidemicen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM:lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/502340en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15636289-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-10844256539en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros97104-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-10844256539&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1033en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1041en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000225725100006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQuah, S=7003418725en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, HP=7501489186en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK

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