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Article: Recognition of cigarette brand names and logos by young children in Hong Kong

TitleRecognition of cigarette brand names and logos by young children in Hong Kong
Authors
Keywordsenvironmental advertising
brand names - recognition
children
Issue Date1995
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://tc.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Tobacco Control, 1995, v. 4 n. 2, p. 150-155 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective-To examine the recognition of cigarette brand names and logos by Hong Kong primary school children. Design - Cross-sectional survey with self-completed questionnaires examining smoking behaviour and recognition of 13 food, drink, cigarette, and toothpaste brand names and logos. Subjects - A total of 9591 primary school children (mean age =10.3; SD = 1.29) living in two districts of Hong Kong included in 1991 as part of a four-year respiratory health, smoking, and air pollution study which started in 1989. Results - Ever-smoking prevalence was 11% (1067); 15% (759) in boys and 7% (308) in girls, and increased with age. Mean age of smoking the first cigarette was 7.8 years. Brand recognition ranged from 53% (Salem name) to 95% (Marlboro name and Salem logo). Significant differences were found by gender and by smoking status for the identification of drink, cigarette, and toothpaste brand groups. After adjustment in a logistic regression model, ever-smokers, who were more likely to be boys (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.91 to 2.57), of older age (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.46 to 1.62), living in Kwai Tsing district (OR = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.14 to 1.50), were more successful than never-smokers in identi¬fying cigarette brands (OR = 1.82; 95% CI = 1.57 to 2.12). Conclusion - Smoking is a paediatric health problem in Hong Kong; tobacco advertisements are widely recognised by young children and associated with smoking experience. A total ban on environmental advertising is needed as part of a comprehensive policy for the prevention of smoking-related disease in Hong Kong.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53525
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.321
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.855

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPeters, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBetson, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOng, SGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:22:19Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:22:19Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTobacco Control, 1995, v. 4 n. 2, p. 150-155en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0964-4563en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53525-
dc.description.abstractObjective-To examine the recognition of cigarette brand names and logos by Hong Kong primary school children. Design - Cross-sectional survey with self-completed questionnaires examining smoking behaviour and recognition of 13 food, drink, cigarette, and toothpaste brand names and logos. Subjects - A total of 9591 primary school children (mean age =10.3; SD = 1.29) living in two districts of Hong Kong included in 1991 as part of a four-year respiratory health, smoking, and air pollution study which started in 1989. Results - Ever-smoking prevalence was 11% (1067); 15% (759) in boys and 7% (308) in girls, and increased with age. Mean age of smoking the first cigarette was 7.8 years. Brand recognition ranged from 53% (Salem name) to 95% (Marlboro name and Salem logo). Significant differences were found by gender and by smoking status for the identification of drink, cigarette, and toothpaste brand groups. After adjustment in a logistic regression model, ever-smokers, who were more likely to be boys (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.91 to 2.57), of older age (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.46 to 1.62), living in Kwai Tsing district (OR = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.14 to 1.50), were more successful than never-smokers in identi¬fying cigarette brands (OR = 1.82; 95% CI = 1.57 to 2.12). Conclusion - Smoking is a paediatric health problem in Hong Kong; tobacco advertisements are widely recognised by young children and associated with smoking experience. A total ban on environmental advertising is needed as part of a comprehensive policy for the prevention of smoking-related disease in Hong Kong.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://tc.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTobacco Control-
dc.rightsTobacco Control. Copyright © BMJ Publishing Group.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectenvironmental advertisingen_HK
dc.subjectbrand names - recognitionen_HK
dc.subjectchildrenen_HK
dc.titleRecognition of cigarette brand names and logos by young children in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0964-4563&volume=4&issue=2&spage=150&epage=155&date=1995&atitle=Recognition+of+cigarette+brand+names+and+logos+by+young+children+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBetson, CL: betsoncl@intercon.neten_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ: hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM: hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/tc.4.2.150en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros8956-

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