File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Under-reporting of inpatient services utilisation in household surveys - A population-based study in Hong Kong

TitleUnder-reporting of inpatient services utilisation in household surveys - A population-based study in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmchealthservres/
Citation
Bmc Health Services Research, 2005, v. 5 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Recognising that household interviews may produce biased estimates of health services utilisation, we examined for under- and over-reporting of hospitalisation episodes in three recent, consecutive population-based household surveys in Hong Kong. Methods: Territory-wide inpatient service utilisation volumes as estimated from the 1999, 2001 and 2002 Thematic Household Surveys (THS) were benchmarked against corresponding statistics derived from routine administrative databases. Between-year differences on net under-reporting were quantified by Cohen's d effect size. To assess the potential for systematic biases in under-reporting, age- and sex-specific net under-reporting rates within each survey year were computed and the F-test was performed to evaluate differences between demographic subgroups. We modelled the effects of age and sex on the likelihood of ever hospitalisation through logistic regression to compare the odds ratios respectively derived from survey and administrative data. Results: The extent of net under-reporting was moderately large in all three years amounting to about one-third of all inpatient episodes. However, there did not appear to be significant systematic biases in the degree of under-reporting by age or sex on stratified analyses and logistic regression modelling. Conclusion: Under-reporting was substantial in Hong Kong's THS. Recall bias was likely most responsible for such reporting inaccuracies. A proper full-design record-check study should be carried out to confirm the present findings. © 2005 Tsui et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53521
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.128
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsui, ELHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PPSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, SVen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:22:13Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:22:13Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Health Services Research, 2005, v. 5en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1472-6963en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53521-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Recognising that household interviews may produce biased estimates of health services utilisation, we examined for under- and over-reporting of hospitalisation episodes in three recent, consecutive population-based household surveys in Hong Kong. Methods: Territory-wide inpatient service utilisation volumes as estimated from the 1999, 2001 and 2002 Thematic Household Surveys (THS) were benchmarked against corresponding statistics derived from routine administrative databases. Between-year differences on net under-reporting were quantified by Cohen's d effect size. To assess the potential for systematic biases in under-reporting, age- and sex-specific net under-reporting rates within each survey year were computed and the F-test was performed to evaluate differences between demographic subgroups. We modelled the effects of age and sex on the likelihood of ever hospitalisation through logistic regression to compare the odds ratios respectively derived from survey and administrative data. Results: The extent of net under-reporting was moderately large in all three years amounting to about one-third of all inpatient episodes. However, there did not appear to be significant systematic biases in the degree of under-reporting by age or sex on stratified analyses and logistic regression modelling. Conclusion: Under-reporting was substantial in Hong Kong's THS. Recall bias was likely most responsible for such reporting inaccuracies. A proper full-design record-check study should be carried out to confirm the present findings. © 2005 Tsui et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmchealthservres/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Health Services Researchen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsB M C Health Services Research. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveys - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHospitalization - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshMental Recallen_HK
dc.subject.meshSelf Disclosureen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.titleUnder-reporting of inpatient services utilisation in household surveys - A population-based study in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1472-6963&volume=5&issue=1&spage=31&epage=&date=2005&atitle=Under-reporting+of+inpatient+services+utilisation+in+household+surveys+--+a+population-based+study+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6963-5-31en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15860127en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1131900-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-19444363800en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros98021-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-19444363800&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229170600001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsui, ELH=9240752200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PPS=8426498200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoi, S=26653972100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, SV=8426498400en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats