File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Article: Prevelance and determinants of diagnostic and prognostic disclosure by radiotherapists and surgeons to patients with terminal cancer in Hong Kong

TitlePrevelance and determinants of diagnostic and prognostic disclosure by radiotherapists and surgeons to patients with terminal cancer in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsCancer
Disclosure
Diagnosis
Prognosis
Information
Issue Date1994
PublisherHong Kong Medical Association.
Citation
Journal of the Hong Kong Medical Association, 1994, v. 46 n. 3, p. 220-230 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper identifies the prevalence and determinants of diagnostic and prognostic information given to terminally ill cancer patients in Hong Kong. Surgeons and radiotherapists (n = 153) were interviewed about the information they gave to their most recently deceased cancer patients. This was explored in relation to doctors' and patients' demographic data, diagnosis, the stage of disease at disclosure, and doctors' attitude. Diagnostic information was disclosed partially in 68% and fully in 46% of cases. Prognosis was disclosed partially in 38% and fully in less than 10% of cases. Determinants of diagnostic disclosure included doctors' attitudes about death, and perceived responsibility for disclosure. The doctor's training and work, and the patient's request for information determined the level of disclosure. After adjustment for a number of social and demographic factors, only the patient's education level remained a significant determinant of the level of prognostic disclosure. A significant proportion of terminally-ill cancer patients do not engage in discussion of diagnosis or prognosis with the doctor caring for them during the last stages of their disease. This reflects the unwillingness to discuss such matters, giving a low priority to information provision, paternalism or other factors, such as little importance being attached to such topics at the late stage of cancer. Thus many cancer patients may fail to learn important information about their disease if they have not engaged in discussion of these topics earlier in their illness. The results of this paper have important implications for medical education in caring for patients with cancer.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53518
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorKo, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGilhooly, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, FSHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:22:08Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:22:08Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the Hong Kong Medical Association, 1994, v. 46 n. 3, p. 220-230en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1010-8424en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53518-
dc.description.abstractThis paper identifies the prevalence and determinants of diagnostic and prognostic information given to terminally ill cancer patients in Hong Kong. Surgeons and radiotherapists (n = 153) were interviewed about the information they gave to their most recently deceased cancer patients. This was explored in relation to doctors' and patients' demographic data, diagnosis, the stage of disease at disclosure, and doctors' attitude. Diagnostic information was disclosed partially in 68% and fully in 46% of cases. Prognosis was disclosed partially in 38% and fully in less than 10% of cases. Determinants of diagnostic disclosure included doctors' attitudes about death, and perceived responsibility for disclosure. The doctor's training and work, and the patient's request for information determined the level of disclosure. After adjustment for a number of social and demographic factors, only the patient's education level remained a significant determinant of the level of prognostic disclosure. A significant proportion of terminally-ill cancer patients do not engage in discussion of diagnosis or prognosis with the doctor caring for them during the last stages of their disease. This reflects the unwillingness to discuss such matters, giving a low priority to information provision, paternalism or other factors, such as little importance being attached to such topics at the late stage of cancer. Thus many cancer patients may fail to learn important information about their disease if they have not engaged in discussion of these topics earlier in their illness. The results of this paper have important implications for medical education in caring for patients with cancer.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong Medical Association.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of the Hong Kong Medical Association. Copyright © Hong Kong Medical Association.en_HK
dc.subjectCanceren_HK
dc.subjectDisclosureen_HK
dc.subjectDiagnosisen_HK
dc.subjectPrognosisen_HK
dc.subjectInformationen_HK
dc.titlePrevelance and determinants of diagnostic and prognostic disclosure by radiotherapists and surgeons to patients with terminal cancer in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1010-8424&volume=46&issue=3&spage=220&epage=230&date=1994&atitle=Prevelance+and+determinants+of+diagnostic+and+prognostic+disclosure+by+radiotherapists+and+surgeons+to+patients+with+terminal+cancer+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ: hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros1509-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats