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Article: Reproductive Phenology of Hong Kong Shrubland

TitleReproductive Phenology of Hong Kong Shrubland
Authors
Keywordsbird migration
China
flowering
fruiting
Hong Kong
Issue Date1993
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TRO
Citation
Journal of Tropical Ecology, 1993, v. 9 n. 4, p. 501-510 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong is on the northern edge of the tropics and near the boundary of the Paleotropical and Holarctic floral kingdoms. The phenological states of 105 plant species in secondary shrubland were recorded weekly for three years. Community patterns of reproductive phenology are highly seasonal and vary little between years. There is a flowering maximum in May and a fruiting maximum in DecemberIJanuary. The winter fruiting peak coincides with diet switching by resident omnivorous birds and the arrival of partially frugivorous migrants from the Eastern Palearctic. However, wind-dispersed species also have a fruiting maximum at the same time, suggesting that fruiting in winter has other advantages.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53347
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.975
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.569

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCorlett, RTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:17:23Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:17:23Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Tropical Ecology, 1993, v. 9 n. 4, p. 501-510en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0266-4674en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53347-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong is on the northern edge of the tropics and near the boundary of the Paleotropical and Holarctic floral kingdoms. The phenological states of 105 plant species in secondary shrubland were recorded weekly for three years. Community patterns of reproductive phenology are highly seasonal and vary little between years. There is a flowering maximum in May and a fruiting maximum in DecemberIJanuary. The winter fruiting peak coincides with diet switching by resident omnivorous birds and the arrival of partially frugivorous migrants from the Eastern Palearctic. However, wind-dispersed species also have a fruiting maximum at the same time, suggesting that fruiting in winter has other advantages.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TROen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Tropical Ecology. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectbird migrationen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectfloweringen_HK
dc.subjectfruitingen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.titleReproductive Phenology of Hong Kong Shrublanden_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0266-4674&volume=9&issue=4&spage=501&epage=510&date=1993&atitle=Reproductive+Phenology+of+Hong+Kong+Shrublanden_HK
dc.identifier.emailCorlett, RT: corlett@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027333073-

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