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Article: Supragingival calculus: Formation and control

TitleSupragingival calculus: Formation and control
Authors
KeywordsAnti-calculus agent
Dental calculus
Microbial mineralization
Organic acid
Plaque mineralization
Issue Date2002
PublisherInternational and American Associations for Dental Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://crobm.iadrjournals.org/
Citation
Critical Reviews In Oral Biology And Medicine, 2002, v. 13 n. 5, p. 426-441 How to Cite?
AbstractDental calculus is composed of inorganic components and organic matrix. Brushite, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, octacalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, and whitlockite form the mineral part of dental calculus. Salivary proteins selectively adsorb on the tooth surface to form an acquired pellicle. It is followed by the adherence of various oral micro-organisms. Fimbriae, flagella, and some other surface proteins are essential for microbial adherence. Microbial co-aggregation and co-adhesion enable some micro-organisms, which are incapable of adhering, to adhere to the pellicle-coated tooth surface. Once organisms attach to the tooth surface, new genes could be expressed so that mature dental plaque can form and biofilm bacteria assume increased resistance to antimicrobial agents. Supersaturation of saliva and plaque fluid with respect to calcium phosphates is the driving force for plaque mineralization. Both salivary flow rate and plaque pH appear to influence the saturation degree of calcium phosphates. Acidic phospholipids and specific proteolipids present in cell membranes play a key role in microbial mineralization. The roles of crystal growth inhibitors, promoters, and organic acids in calculus formation are discussed. Application of biofilm culture systems in plaque mineralization is concisely reviewed. Anti-calculus agents used - centering on triclosan plus polyvinyl methyl ether/maleic acid copolymer, pyrophosphate plus polyvinyl methyl ether/maleic acid copolymer, and zinc ion - in commercial dentifrices are also discussed in this paper.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53188
ISSN
2006 Impact Factor: 6.0
2007 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.029
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJin, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, HKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:03:41Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:03:41Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCritical Reviews In Oral Biology And Medicine, 2002, v. 13 n. 5, p. 426-441en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1045-4411en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/53188-
dc.description.abstractDental calculus is composed of inorganic components and organic matrix. Brushite, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, octacalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, and whitlockite form the mineral part of dental calculus. Salivary proteins selectively adsorb on the tooth surface to form an acquired pellicle. It is followed by the adherence of various oral micro-organisms. Fimbriae, flagella, and some other surface proteins are essential for microbial adherence. Microbial co-aggregation and co-adhesion enable some micro-organisms, which are incapable of adhering, to adhere to the pellicle-coated tooth surface. Once organisms attach to the tooth surface, new genes could be expressed so that mature dental plaque can form and biofilm bacteria assume increased resistance to antimicrobial agents. Supersaturation of saliva and plaque fluid with respect to calcium phosphates is the driving force for plaque mineralization. Both salivary flow rate and plaque pH appear to influence the saturation degree of calcium phosphates. Acidic phospholipids and specific proteolipids present in cell membranes play a key role in microbial mineralization. The roles of crystal growth inhibitors, promoters, and organic acids in calculus formation are discussed. Application of biofilm culture systems in plaque mineralization is concisely reviewed. Anti-calculus agents used - centering on triclosan plus polyvinyl methyl ether/maleic acid copolymer, pyrophosphate plus polyvinyl methyl ether/maleic acid copolymer, and zinc ion - in commercial dentifrices are also discussed in this paper.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInternational and American Associations for Dental Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://crobm.iadrjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCritical Reviews in Oral Biology and Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAnti-calculus agenten_HK
dc.subjectDental calculusen_HK
dc.subjectMicrobial mineralizationen_HK
dc.subjectOrganic aciden_HK
dc.subjectPlaque mineralizationen_HK
dc.titleSupragingival calculus: Formation and controlen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1045-4411&volume=13&issue=5&spage=426&epage=441&date=2002&atitle=Supragingival+Calculus:+Formation+and+Control.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, HK: kevin.h.k.yip@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, HK=rp00027en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036050569en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros80780-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036050569&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage426en_HK
dc.identifier.epage441en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, Y=55215762600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, HK=25423244900en_HK

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