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Article: Evolutionary dynamics of genetic variation in Epstein-Barr virus isolates of diverse geographical origins: Evidence for immune pressure- independent genetic drift

TitleEvolutionary dynamics of genetic variation in Epstein-Barr virus isolates of diverse geographical origins: Evidence for immune pressure- independent genetic drift
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
Citation
Journal Of Virology, 1997, v. 71 n. 11, p. 8340-8346 How to Cite?
AbstractThe question whether immune pressure exerted by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can influence the long-term evolution of genetically stable viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has generated considerable scientific interest, primarily due to its important implications for the overall biology of the virus. While arguing for a role of CTLs in the evolution of viruses, it is important to differentiate between genetic variation in virus and immune recognition of these variant virus by CTLs. To assess the role of genetic selection in the long-term evolution of EBV, we have analyzed a large panel of type 1 EBV isolates from African, Southeast Asian, Papua-New Guinean (PNG), and Australian Caucasian individuals. Seven different regions of the EBV genome, which include nine CTL epitopes restricted through a range of HLA class I alleles, were sequenced and compared. Although numerous nucleotide changes were identified within these isolates, comparison of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions in the CTL epitope indicated that the genetic variation was generated mostly independently of immune selection pressure. Surprisingly, an inverse correlation between genetic variation within certain CTL epitopes and the frequency distribution of HLA alleles that present the CTL epitopes was seen, suggesting that the evolutionary pressures on the CTL epitopes of the virus may he toward their conservation rather than their inactivation. Furthermore, molecular evolutionary genetic analysis of nucleotide sequences revealed that viral isolates from PNG are evolving as a lineage distinct from isolates from African, Southeast Asian, and Australian Caucasian individuals.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49409
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.347
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKhanna, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorSlade, RWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoulsen, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorMoss, DJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBurrows, SRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBurrows, JMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:41:52Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:41:52Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Virology, 1997, v. 71 n. 11, p. 8340-8346en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-538Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49409-
dc.description.abstractThe question whether immune pressure exerted by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can influence the long-term evolution of genetically stable viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has generated considerable scientific interest, primarily due to its important implications for the overall biology of the virus. While arguing for a role of CTLs in the evolution of viruses, it is important to differentiate between genetic variation in virus and immune recognition of these variant virus by CTLs. To assess the role of genetic selection in the long-term evolution of EBV, we have analyzed a large panel of type 1 EBV isolates from African, Southeast Asian, Papua-New Guinean (PNG), and Australian Caucasian individuals. Seven different regions of the EBV genome, which include nine CTL epitopes restricted through a range of HLA class I alleles, were sequenced and compared. Although numerous nucleotide changes were identified within these isolates, comparison of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions in the CTL epitope indicated that the genetic variation was generated mostly independently of immune selection pressure. Surprisingly, an inverse correlation between genetic variation within certain CTL epitopes and the frequency distribution of HLA alleles that present the CTL epitopes was seen, suggesting that the evolutionary pressures on the CTL epitopes of the virus may he toward their conservation rather than their inactivation. Furthermore, molecular evolutionary genetic analysis of nucleotide sequences revealed that viral isolates from PNG are evolving as a lineage distinct from isolates from African, Southeast Asian, and Australian Caucasian individuals.en_HK
dc.format.extent418 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Virology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, Journal of Virology, 1997, v. 71 n. 11, p. 8340-8346en_HK
dc.subject.meshHerpesvirus 4, Human - genetics - immunologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAmino Acid Sequenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultureden_HK
dc.subject.meshDNA, Viral - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshEpitope Mappingen_HK
dc.titleEvolutionary dynamics of genetic variation in Epstein-Barr virus isolates of diverse geographical origins: Evidence for immune pressure- independent genetic driften_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-538X&volume=71&issue=11&spage=8340&epage=8346&date=1997&atitle=Evolutionary+dynamics+of+genetic+variation+in+Epstein-Barr+virus+isolates+of+diverse+geographical+origins:+evidence+for+immune+pressure-independent+genetic+driften_HK
dc.identifier.emailNicholls, J:nicholls@pathology.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNicholls, J=rp00364en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9343187en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC192293-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030798483en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros34028-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030798483&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume71en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage8340en_HK
dc.identifier.epage8346en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997YB14300031-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK

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