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Article: Prepubescents' ventilatory responses to exercise with reference to sex and body size

TitlePrepubescents' ventilatory responses to exercise with reference to sex and body size
Authors
KeywordsAllometric modeling
Children
Exercise
Ventilation
Issue Date1997
PublisherAmerican College of Chest Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.chestjournal.org
Citation
Chest, 1997, v. 112 n. 6, p. 1554-1560 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy objectives: To examine the ventilatory responses of prepubescent children to submaximal and peak exercise using appropriate allometric modeling to control for differences in body size. Design: Cross-sectional study of a representative sample of children. Setting: Middle schools (8 to 11 years) in Exeter, UK. Participants: We studied 101 boys and 76 girls aged 11.1 (0.4) years and classified Tanner stage 1 for pubic hair (no true pubic hair). Measurements: At rest: stature, mass, sum of skinfolds, hemoglobin concentration, FVC, and FEV1. During treadmill exercise at 7, 8, 9, and 10 km/h, and at peak exercise: oxygen uptake (V̇O2), minute ventilation (V̇E), tidal volume (VT), and respiratory frequency (Rf). Results: At peak exercise, boys' V̇O2, V̇E, and VT were significantly (p<0.01) higher than girls' values and remained so even when the influence of body size was controlled using allometric principles. There were no significant (p>0.05) sex differences in Rf or the ratios VT/FVC or V̇E/V̇O2. When data were compared at the same relative exercise intensity (ie, 70 to 75% or 80 to 85% peak V̇O2), no significant (p>0.05) sex differences in Rf, VT/FVC, or V̇E/V̇EO2 were detected. Boys' higher (p<0.001) V̇O2 values were reflected by their higher V̇E which remained higher than values for girls at both submaximal levels even when the influence of body size was covaried out. Conclusions: Prepubescent boys demonstrate higher peak V̇O2 than girls and this is supported by a higher V̇E and VT, even when the influence of body size is accounted for using allometry. Other ventilatory responses to both peak exercise and exercise at the same relative intensity are remarkably similar in both boys and girls.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49396
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.94
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.176
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKirby, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWelsman, JRen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:41:25Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:41:25Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChest, 1997, v. 112 n. 6, p. 1554-1560en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0012-3692en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49396-
dc.description.abstractStudy objectives: To examine the ventilatory responses of prepubescent children to submaximal and peak exercise using appropriate allometric modeling to control for differences in body size. Design: Cross-sectional study of a representative sample of children. Setting: Middle schools (8 to 11 years) in Exeter, UK. Participants: We studied 101 boys and 76 girls aged 11.1 (0.4) years and classified Tanner stage 1 for pubic hair (no true pubic hair). Measurements: At rest: stature, mass, sum of skinfolds, hemoglobin concentration, FVC, and FEV1. During treadmill exercise at 7, 8, 9, and 10 km/h, and at peak exercise: oxygen uptake (V̇O2), minute ventilation (V̇E), tidal volume (VT), and respiratory frequency (Rf). Results: At peak exercise, boys' V̇O2, V̇E, and VT were significantly (p<0.01) higher than girls' values and remained so even when the influence of body size was controlled using allometric principles. There were no significant (p>0.05) sex differences in Rf or the ratios VT/FVC or V̇E/V̇O2. When data were compared at the same relative exercise intensity (ie, 70 to 75% or 80 to 85% peak V̇O2), no significant (p>0.05) sex differences in Rf, VT/FVC, or V̇E/V̇EO2 were detected. Boys' higher (p<0.001) V̇O2 values were reflected by their higher V̇E which remained higher than values for girls at both submaximal levels even when the influence of body size was covaried out. Conclusions: Prepubescent boys demonstrate higher peak V̇O2 than girls and this is supported by a higher V̇E and VT, even when the influence of body size is accounted for using allometry. Other ventilatory responses to both peak exercise and exercise at the same relative intensity are remarkably similar in both boys and girls.en_HK
dc.format.extent418 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican College of Chest Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.chestjournal.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChesten_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAllometric modelingen_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectExerciseen_HK
dc.subjectVentilationen_HK
dc.titlePrepubescents' ventilatory responses to exercise with reference to sex and body sizeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0012-3692&volume=112&issue=6&spage=1554&epage=1560&date=1997&atitle=Prepubescents%27+ventilatory+responses+to+exercise+with+reference+to+sex+and+body+sizeen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcManus, AM: alimac@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcManus, AM=rp00936en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1378/chest.112.6.1554en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9404753en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031470458en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros34233-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031470458&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume112en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1554en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1560en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997YK95900020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArmstrong, N=7101927255en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKirby, BJ=21334715300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcManus, AM=7004635919en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWelsman, JR=6701780313en_HK

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