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Article: Do the nonsmoking daughters of smokers tend to marry smokers? Implications for epidemiological research on environmental tobacco smoke: the IARC collaborative study

TitleDo the nonsmoking daughters of smokers tend to marry smokers? Implications for epidemiological research on environmental tobacco smoke: the IARC collaborative study
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research.
Citation
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, 1995, v. 4 n. 8, p. 821-824 How to Cite?
AbstractThe IARC collaborative study on exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) involved collecting interview data and biochemical indicators of exposure from 1369 nonsmoking women in 13 centers in 10 countries. Information on childhood and adulthood exposure to other people's smoke and duration of this exposure from both parents and spouse was gathered at the interview. Of the 900 women whose husbands smoked (current or exsmokers), 71.3% had one or both parents who smoked (predominantly the father), whereas among the 277 women married to never-smokers, only 60.3% had at least one parent who smoked. The odds ratio for the daughter of a smoker to marry a smoker was, therefore, 1.64 (95% confidence interval = 1.24-2.17; P > 0.001), and there was an exposure-response relation between the number of years of childhood exposure to ETS from the parents and the likelihood of being married to a smoker. These results show that nonsmoking women married to smokers are more likely to have been exposed to tobacco pollution during their whole life. Because the duration of exposure is known to be important in the genesis of lung cancer, some of the excess risk of lung cancer in nonsmoking women married to smokers may be due exposure to ETS from parents during childhood.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49380
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.622
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.579
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRiboli, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorHaley, NJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTredaniel, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSaracci, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorPreston-Martin, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTrichopoulos, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorBecher, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBurch, JDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFontham, ETHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGao, YTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJindal, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKoo, LCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLe Marchand, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorSegnan, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShimizu, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStanta, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu-Williams, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZatonski, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:40:54Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:40:54Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, 1995, v. 4 n. 8, p. 821-824en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1055-9965en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49380-
dc.description.abstractThe IARC collaborative study on exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) involved collecting interview data and biochemical indicators of exposure from 1369 nonsmoking women in 13 centers in 10 countries. Information on childhood and adulthood exposure to other people's smoke and duration of this exposure from both parents and spouse was gathered at the interview. Of the 900 women whose husbands smoked (current or exsmokers), 71.3% had one or both parents who smoked (predominantly the father), whereas among the 277 women married to never-smokers, only 60.3% had at least one parent who smoked. The odds ratio for the daughter of a smoker to marry a smoker was, therefore, 1.64 (95% confidence interval = 1.24-2.17; P > 0.001), and there was an exposure-response relation between the number of years of childhood exposure to ETS from the parents and the likelihood of being married to a smoker. These results show that nonsmoking women married to smokers are more likely to have been exposed to tobacco pollution during their whole life. Because the duration of exposure is known to be important in the genesis of lung cancer, some of the excess risk of lung cancer in nonsmoking women married to smokers may be due exposure to ETS from parents during childhood.en_HK
dc.format.extent418 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshMarriageen_HK
dc.subject.meshNuclear Familyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSmoking - adverse effects - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollutionen_HK
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervalsen_HK
dc.titleDo the nonsmoking daughters of smokers tend to marry smokers? Implications for epidemiological research on environmental tobacco smoke: the IARC collaborative studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1055-9965&volume=4&issue=8&spage=821&epage=824&date=1995&atitle=Do+the+nonsmoking+daughters+of+smokers+tend+to+marry+smokers?+Implications+for+epidemiological+research+on+environmental+tobacco+smoke:+the+IARC+collaborative+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKoo, LC: hrmrklc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid8634651en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros9287-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995TJ52300003-

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