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Article: Understanding the spatial clustering of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Hong Kong
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TitleUnderstanding the spatial clustering of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsLai, PC2
Wong, CM2
Hedley, AJ2
Lo, SV3
Leung, PY
Kong, J1
Leung, GM2
 
KeywordsGeographic information systems
GIS
SARS
Severe acute respiratory syndrome
Spatial distribution
 
Issue Date2004
 
PublisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/
 
CitationEnvironmental Health Perspectives, 2004, v. 112 n. 15, p. 1550-1556 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.7117
 
AbstractWe applied cartographic and geostatistical methods in analyzing the patterns of disease spread during the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in Hong Kong using geographic information system (GIS) technology. We analyzed an integrated database that contained clinical and personal details on all 1,755 patients confirmed to have SARS from 15 February to 22 June 2003. Elementary mapping of disease occurrences in space and time simultaneously revealed the geographic extent of spread throughout the territory. Statistical surfaces created by the kernel method confirmed that SARS cases were highly clustered and identified distinct disease "hot spots." Contextual analysis of mean and standard deviation of different density classes indicated that the period from day 1 (18 February) through day 16 (6 March) was the prodrome of the epidemic, whereas days 86 (15 May) to 106 (4 June) marked the declining phase of the outbreak. Origin-and-destination plots showed the directional bias and radius of spread of superspreading events. Integration of GIS technology into routine field epidemiologic surveillance can offer a real-time quantitative method for identifying and tracking the geospatial spread of infectious diseases, as our experience with SARS has demonstrated.
 
ISSN0091-6765
2013 Impact Factor: 7.029
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.054
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.7117
 
PubMed Central IDPMC1247620
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000224972500044
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLai, PC
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJ
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, SV
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, PY
 
dc.contributor.authorKong, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM
 
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:40:53Z
 
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:40:53Z
 
dc.date.issued2004
 
dc.description.abstractWe applied cartographic and geostatistical methods in analyzing the patterns of disease spread during the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in Hong Kong using geographic information system (GIS) technology. We analyzed an integrated database that contained clinical and personal details on all 1,755 patients confirmed to have SARS from 15 February to 22 June 2003. Elementary mapping of disease occurrences in space and time simultaneously revealed the geographic extent of spread throughout the territory. Statistical surfaces created by the kernel method confirmed that SARS cases were highly clustered and identified distinct disease "hot spots." Contextual analysis of mean and standard deviation of different density classes indicated that the period from day 1 (18 February) through day 16 (6 March) was the prodrome of the epidemic, whereas days 86 (15 May) to 106 (4 June) marked the declining phase of the outbreak. Origin-and-destination plots showed the directional bias and radius of spread of superspreading events. Integration of GIS technology into routine field epidemiologic surveillance can offer a real-time quantitative method for identifying and tracking the geospatial spread of infectious diseases, as our experience with SARS has demonstrated.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.format.extent388 bytes
 
dc.format.mimetypetext/html
 
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Health Perspectives, 2004, v. 112 n. 15, p. 1550-1556 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.7117
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.7117
 
dc.identifier.epage1556
 
dc.identifier.hkuros92402
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224972500044
 
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765
2013 Impact Factor: 7.029
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.054
 
dc.identifier.issue15
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1247620
 
dc.identifier.pmid15531441
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-7244259666
 
dc.identifier.spage1550
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49379
 
dc.identifier.volume112
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Health Perspectives
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks
 
dc.subject.meshGeographic Information Systems
 
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillance
 
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Factual
 
dc.subjectGeographic information systems
 
dc.subjectGIS
 
dc.subjectSARS
 
dc.subjectSevere acute respiratory syndrome
 
dc.subjectSpatial distribution
 
dc.titleUnderstanding the spatial clustering of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Hong Kong Hospital Authority
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Food and Health Bureau