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Article: Incentives and barriers that influence clinical computerization in Hong Kong: A population-based physician survey

TitleIncentives and barriers that influence clinical computerization in Hong Kong: A population-based physician survey
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherHanley & Belfus, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jamia
Citation
Journal Of The American Medical Informatics Association, 2003, v. 10 n. 2, p. 201-212 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Given the slow adoption of medical informatics in Hong Kong and Asia, we sought to understand the contributory barriers and potential incentives associated with information technology implementation. Design and Measurements: A representative sample of 949 doctors (response rate = 77.0%) was asked through a postal survey to rank a list of nine barriers associated with clinical computerization according to self-perceived importance. They ranked seven incentives or catalysts that may influence computerization. We generated mean rank scores and used multidimensional preference analysis to explore key explanatory dimensions of these variables. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to identify homogenous subgroups of respondents. We further determined the relationships between the sets of barriers and incentives/catalysts collectively using canonical correlation. Results: Time costs, lack of technical support and large capital investments were the biggest barriers to computerization, whereas improved office efficiency and better-quality care were ranked highest as potential incentives to computerize. Cost vs. noncost, physician-related vs. patient-related, and monetary vs. nonmonetary factors were the key dimensions explaining the barrier variables. Similarly, within-practice vs external and "push" vs "pull" factors accounted for the incentive variables. Four clusters were identified for barriers and three for incentives/catalysts. Canonical correlation revealed that respondents who were concerned with the costs of computerization also perceived financial incentives and government regulation to be important incentives/catalysts toward computerization. Those who found the potential interference with communication important also believed that the promise of improved care from computerization to be a significant incentive. Conclusion: This study provided evidence regarding common barriers associated with clinical computerization. Our findings also identified possible incentive strategies that may be employed to accelerate uptake of computer systems.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49375
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.428
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.315
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, PLHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, IOLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTin, KYKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:40:47Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:40:47Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Medical Informatics Association, 2003, v. 10 n. 2, p. 201-212en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1067-5027en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49375-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Given the slow adoption of medical informatics in Hong Kong and Asia, we sought to understand the contributory barriers and potential incentives associated with information technology implementation. Design and Measurements: A representative sample of 949 doctors (response rate = 77.0%) was asked through a postal survey to rank a list of nine barriers associated with clinical computerization according to self-perceived importance. They ranked seven incentives or catalysts that may influence computerization. We generated mean rank scores and used multidimensional preference analysis to explore key explanatory dimensions of these variables. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to identify homogenous subgroups of respondents. We further determined the relationships between the sets of barriers and incentives/catalysts collectively using canonical correlation. Results: Time costs, lack of technical support and large capital investments were the biggest barriers to computerization, whereas improved office efficiency and better-quality care were ranked highest as potential incentives to computerize. Cost vs. noncost, physician-related vs. patient-related, and monetary vs. nonmonetary factors were the key dimensions explaining the barrier variables. Similarly, within-practice vs external and "push" vs "pull" factors accounted for the incentive variables. Four clusters were identified for barriers and three for incentives/catalysts. Canonical correlation revealed that respondents who were concerned with the costs of computerization also perceived financial incentives and government regulation to be important incentives/catalysts toward computerization. Those who found the potential interference with communication important also believed that the promise of improved care from computerization to be a significant incentive. Conclusion: This study provided evidence regarding common barriers associated with clinical computerization. Our findings also identified possible incentive strategies that may be employed to accelerate uptake of computer systems.en_HK
dc.format.extent386 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHanley & Belfus, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jamiaen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Informatics Associationen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Computersen_HK
dc.subject.meshComputer Systems - economicsen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhysicians - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPractice Management - organization & administrationen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnelen_HK
dc.titleIncentives and barriers that influence clinical computerization in Hong Kong: A population-based physician surveyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1067-5027&volume=10&issue=2&spage=201&epage=212&date=2003&atitle=Incentives+and+barriers+that+influence+clinical+computerization+in+Hong+Kong:+a+population-based+physician+surveyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYu, PLH: plhyu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, IOL: iolwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, JM: jjohnsto@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTin, KYK: tinyiukei@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYu, PLH=rp00835en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, IOL=rp01806en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, JM=rp00375en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTin, KYK=rp00494en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1197/jamia.M1202en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12595409en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC150373en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037353291en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros76454-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037353291&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage201en_HK
dc.identifier.epage212en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000181847300009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, PLH=7403599794en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, IOL=7102513940en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JM=7403397964en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTin, KYK=7003796897en_HK

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