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Article: Effect of air pollution on daily mortality in Hong Kong

TitleEffect of air pollution on daily mortality in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAir pollutant concentrations
Daily mortality
Exposure-response
Offset
Stratification by seasons
Issue Date2001
PublisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/
Citation
Environmental Health Perspectives, 2001, v. 109 n. 4, p. 335-340 How to Cite?
AbstractIn different weather conditions, constituents and concentrations of pollutants, personal exposure, and biologic responses to air pollution may vary. In this study we assessed the effects of four air pollutants on mortality in both cool and warm seasons in Hong Kong, a subtropical city. Daily counts of mortality, due to all nonaccidental causes, and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases were modeled with daily pollutant concentrations [24-hr means for nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter < 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10); 8-hr mean for ozone]. using Poisson regression. We controlled for confounding factors by fitting the terms in models, in line with those recommended by the APHEA (Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach) protocol. Exposure-response relationships in warm and cool seasons were examined using generalized additive modeling. During the cool season, for a linear extrapolation of 10th-90th percentiles in the pollutant concentrations of all oxidant pollutants, NO2, SO2, and O3, we found significant effects on all the mortality outcomes under study, with relative risks (RR) of 1.04-1.10 (p < 0.038, except p = 0.079 for SO2 on respiratory mortality). We observed consistent positive exposure-response relationships during the cool season but not during the warm season. The effects of PM10 were marginally significant (RR = 1.06; p = 0.054) for respiratory mortality but not for the other outcomes (p > 0.135). In this subtropical city, local air quality objectives should take into account that air pollution has stronger health effects during the cool rather than warm season and that oxidant pollutants are more important indicators of health effects than particulates.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49371
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.443
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.529
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMa, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:40:42Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:40:42Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Health Perspectives, 2001, v. 109 n. 4, p. 335-340en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49371-
dc.description.abstractIn different weather conditions, constituents and concentrations of pollutants, personal exposure, and biologic responses to air pollution may vary. In this study we assessed the effects of four air pollutants on mortality in both cool and warm seasons in Hong Kong, a subtropical city. Daily counts of mortality, due to all nonaccidental causes, and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases were modeled with daily pollutant concentrations [24-hr means for nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter < 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10); 8-hr mean for ozone]. using Poisson regression. We controlled for confounding factors by fitting the terms in models, in line with those recommended by the APHEA (Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach) protocol. Exposure-response relationships in warm and cool seasons were examined using generalized additive modeling. During the cool season, for a linear extrapolation of 10th-90th percentiles in the pollutant concentrations of all oxidant pollutants, NO2, SO2, and O3, we found significant effects on all the mortality outcomes under study, with relative risks (RR) of 1.04-1.10 (p < 0.038, except p = 0.079 for SO2 on respiratory mortality). We observed consistent positive exposure-response relationships during the cool season but not during the warm season. The effects of PM10 were marginally significant (RR = 1.06; p = 0.054) for respiratory mortality but not for the other outcomes (p > 0.135). In this subtropical city, local air quality objectives should take into account that air pollution has stronger health effects during the cool rather than warm season and that oxidant pollutants are more important indicators of health effects than particulates.en_HK
dc.format.extent388 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Health Perspectivesen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAir pollutant concentrationsen_HK
dc.subjectDaily mortalityen_HK
dc.subjectExposure-responseen_HK
dc.subjectOffseten_HK
dc.subjectStratification by seasonsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants - adverse effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposureen_HK
dc.subject.meshMortality - trendsen_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshConfounding Factors (Epidemiology)en_HK
dc.titleEffect of air pollution on daily mortality in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0091-6765&volume=109&issue=4&spage=335&epage=340&date=2001&atitle=Effect+of+air+pollution+on+daily+mortality+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM:hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11335180-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1240272en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035025289en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros56682-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035025289&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume109en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage335en_HK
dc.identifier.epage340en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000168413600022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, S=24477737900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK

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