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Article: Respiratory symptoms due to active and passive smoking in junior secondary school students in Hong Kong

TitleRespiratory symptoms due to active and passive smoking in junior secondary school students in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsChildren
Chinese
Hong Kong
Passive smoking
Respiratory symptoms
Smoking
Issue Date1998
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
International Journal Of Epidemiology, 1998, v. 27 n. 1, p. 41-48 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Evidence on respiratory symptoms due to smoking and passive smoking in children is mainly derived from studies in Western countries. Evidence from the East was required to support stronger tobacco control policy in Asia. This study aimed to analyse the relationship between respiratory symptoms and smoking status in junior secondary students and between respiratory symptoms and family smoking in never-smoking students. Methods. In a cross-sectional survey in 1994, anonymous questionnaires were administered to a two-stage cluster probability sample of 6304 students, aged mostly 12-15 years, from 172 classes of 61 schools in Hong Kong. Results. Significant linear trends were found between smoking and the prevalence of throat and nose problems, cough and phlegm, and wheezing. The odds ratio (OR), after adjustment for age, gender, area of residence, type of housing and correlation within schools and classes (cluster effects), for smoking at least weekly ranged from 1.35 to 4.84. In never-smoking children, significant trends were found between the number of smokers living with the children and throat and nose problems, cough and phlegm, and recent wheezing. The adjusted OR and 95% confidence interval (CI) for any cough or phlegm symptoms was 1.19 (95% CI : 1.01-1.47) for one smoking household member, 1.38 (95% CI: 1.07-1.79) for two and 1.85 (95% CI: 1.19-2.85) for three (P for trend < 0.001). Increased OR were found for father and mother smoking. Conclusions. This study provides strong evidence that both active and passive smoking can cause respiratory ill health in Chinese children in Hong Kong. Urgent measures are needed to protect children from the health hazards of active and passive smoking in Asia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49368
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.522
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.381
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, SFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBetson, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:40:38Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:40:38Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Epidemiology, 1998, v. 27 n. 1, p. 41-48en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49368-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Evidence on respiratory symptoms due to smoking and passive smoking in children is mainly derived from studies in Western countries. Evidence from the East was required to support stronger tobacco control policy in Asia. This study aimed to analyse the relationship between respiratory symptoms and smoking status in junior secondary students and between respiratory symptoms and family smoking in never-smoking students. Methods. In a cross-sectional survey in 1994, anonymous questionnaires were administered to a two-stage cluster probability sample of 6304 students, aged mostly 12-15 years, from 172 classes of 61 schools in Hong Kong. Results. Significant linear trends were found between smoking and the prevalence of throat and nose problems, cough and phlegm, and wheezing. The odds ratio (OR), after adjustment for age, gender, area of residence, type of housing and correlation within schools and classes (cluster effects), for smoking at least weekly ranged from 1.35 to 4.84. In never-smoking children, significant trends were found between the number of smokers living with the children and throat and nose problems, cough and phlegm, and recent wheezing. The adjusted OR and 95% confidence interval (CI) for any cough or phlegm symptoms was 1.19 (95% CI : 1.01-1.47) for one smoking household member, 1.38 (95% CI: 1.07-1.79) for two and 1.85 (95% CI: 1.19-2.85) for three (P for trend < 0.001). Increased OR were found for father and mother smoking. Conclusions. This study provides strong evidence that both active and passive smoking can cause respiratory ill health in Chinese children in Hong Kong. Urgent measures are needed to protect children from the health hazards of active and passive smoking in Asia.en_HK
dc.format.extent418 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectPassive smokingen_HK
dc.subjectRespiratory symptomsen_HK
dc.subjectSmokingen_HK
dc.titleRespiratory symptoms due to active and passive smoking in junior secondary school students in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-5771&volume=27&issue=1&spage=41&epage=48&date=1998&atitle=Respiratory+symptoms+due+to+active+and+passive+smoking+in+junior+secondary+school+students+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM:hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ije/27.1.41en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9563692-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031911798en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros31087-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031911798&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume27en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage41en_HK
dc.identifier.epage48en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000072720800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, SF=19233745400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBetson, CL=6602173411en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK

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