File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Treatment of Biliary Atresia by Portoenterostomy and Liver Transplantation: The Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Experience
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleTreatment of Biliary Atresia by Portoenterostomy and Liver Transplantation: The Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Experience
 
AuthorsSaing, H1
Fan, ST1
Chan, KL1
Wei, W1
Mya, GH1
Lo, CM1
Cheng, W1
 
KeywordsBiliary atresia
Liver transplantation
Microvascular surgery
Portoenterostomy
 
Issue Date1997
 
PublisherTohoku University Medical Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journal.med.tohoku.ac.jp/
 
CitationTohoku Journal Of Experimental Medicine, 1997, v. 181 n. 1, p. 109-116 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1620/tjem.181.109
 
AbstractNinety three out of 96 patients with biliary atresia (BA) underwent Kasai 1 portoenterostomy and 11 children subsequently underwent 12 liver transplantation (LTX) procedures which included 8 living related liver transplants (LRLT), 3 reduced-size liver transplants (RSLT) and 1 orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). During a follow-up period of 3-206 months (mean, 73 months) after portoenterostomy and 3-63 months after LTX, 50% of 96 patients are alive and well with total clearance of jaundice while 12% are mildly jaundiced, 10% are deeply jaundiced and 28% have died. Two of the 3 patients who did not undergo portoenterostomy and 25 from the portoenterostomy group have died. Of the latter group, 22 deaths occurred before, and 3 after the introduction of LTX therapy respectively. Of the 68 long-term survivors, 32 are less than 5, and 36 are 6-17 years old. Complete clearance of jaundice was achieved in 55% of patients irrespective of whether portoenterostomy was initially performed at <10 or between 10 and 12 weeks. Portoenterostomy performed beyond 13 weeks was associated with declining results. We conclude that (1) portoenterostomy combined with liver transplantation, when indicated, has given patients with BA a much better prognosis and (2) pediatric LTX in our institute is a well established procedure with 100% patient and 88% primary graft survival.
 
ISSN0040-8727
2013 Impact Factor: 1.283
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1620/tjem.181.109
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:A1997WP06600013
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSaing, H
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, ST
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorWei, W
 
dc.contributor.authorMya, GH
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, W
 
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:39:18Z
 
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:39:18Z
 
dc.date.issued1997
 
dc.description.abstractNinety three out of 96 patients with biliary atresia (BA) underwent Kasai 1 portoenterostomy and 11 children subsequently underwent 12 liver transplantation (LTX) procedures which included 8 living related liver transplants (LRLT), 3 reduced-size liver transplants (RSLT) and 1 orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). During a follow-up period of 3-206 months (mean, 73 months) after portoenterostomy and 3-63 months after LTX, 50% of 96 patients are alive and well with total clearance of jaundice while 12% are mildly jaundiced, 10% are deeply jaundiced and 28% have died. Two of the 3 patients who did not undergo portoenterostomy and 25 from the portoenterostomy group have died. Of the latter group, 22 deaths occurred before, and 3 after the introduction of LTX therapy respectively. Of the 68 long-term survivors, 32 are less than 5, and 36 are 6-17 years old. Complete clearance of jaundice was achieved in 55% of patients irrespective of whether portoenterostomy was initially performed at <10 or between 10 and 12 weeks. Portoenterostomy performed beyond 13 weeks was associated with declining results. We conclude that (1) portoenterostomy combined with liver transplantation, when indicated, has given patients with BA a much better prognosis and (2) pediatric LTX in our institute is a well established procedure with 100% patient and 88% primary graft survival.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.format.extent418 bytes
 
dc.format.mimetypetext/html
 
dc.identifier.citationTohoku Journal Of Experimental Medicine, 1997, v. 181 n. 1, p. 109-116 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1620/tjem.181.109
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1620/tjem.181.109
 
dc.identifier.epage116
 
dc.identifier.hkuros24215
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997WP06600013
 
dc.identifier.issn0040-8727
2013 Impact Factor: 1.283
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid9149345
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030632749
 
dc.identifier.spage109
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49316
 
dc.identifier.volume181
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherTohoku University Medical Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journal.med.tohoku.ac.jp/
 
dc.publisher.placeJapan
 
dc.relation.ispartofTohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectBiliary atresia
 
dc.subjectLiver transplantation
 
dc.subjectMicrovascular surgery
 
dc.subjectPortoenterostomy
 
dc.titleTreatment of Biliary Atresia by Portoenterostomy and Liver Transplantation: The Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Experience
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Saing, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Fan, ST</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, KL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wei, W</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Mya, GH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lo, CM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheng, W</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2008-06-12T06:39:18Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2008-06-12T06:39:18Z</date.available>
<date.issued>1997</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Tohoku Journal Of Experimental Medicine, 1997, v. 181 n. 1, p. 109-116</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0040-8727</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/49316</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Ninety three out of 96 patients with biliary atresia (BA) underwent Kasai 1 portoenterostomy and 11 children subsequently underwent 12 liver transplantation (LTX) procedures which included 8 living related liver transplants (LRLT), 3 reduced-size liver transplants (RSLT) and 1 orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). During a follow-up period of 3-206 months (mean, 73 months) after portoenterostomy and 3-63 months after LTX, 50% of 96 patients are alive and well with total clearance of jaundice while 12% are mildly jaundiced, 10% are deeply jaundiced and 28% have died. Two of the 3 patients who did not undergo portoenterostomy and 25 from the portoenterostomy group have died. Of the latter group, 22 deaths occurred before, and 3 after the introduction of LTX therapy respectively. Of the 68 long-term survivors, 32 are less than 5, and 36 are 6-17 years old. Complete clearance of jaundice was achieved in 55% of patients irrespective of whether portoenterostomy was initially performed at &lt;10 or between 10 and 12 weeks. Portoenterostomy performed beyond 13 weeks was associated with declining results. We conclude that (1) portoenterostomy combined with liver transplantation, when indicated, has given patients with BA a much better prognosis and (2) pediatric LTX in our institute is a well established procedure with 100% patient and 88% primary graft survival.</description.abstract>
<format.extent>418 bytes</format.extent>
<format.mimetype>text/html</format.mimetype>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Tohoku University Medical Press. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://journal.med.tohoku.ac.jp/</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine</relation.ispartof>
<rights>Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License</rights>
<subject>Biliary atresia</subject>
<subject>Liver transplantation</subject>
<subject>Microvascular surgery</subject>
<subject>Portoenterostomy</subject>
<title>Treatment of Biliary Atresia by Portoenterostomy and Liver Transplantation: The Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Experience</title>
<type>Article</type>
<identifier.openurl>http://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&amp;issn=0040-8727&amp;volume=181&amp;issue=1&amp;spage=109&amp;epage=116&amp;date=1997&amp;atitle=Treatment+of+biliary+atresia+by+portoenterostomy+and+liver+transplantation:+the+Queen+Mary+Hospital,+Hong+Kong+experience</identifier.openurl>
<description.nature>published_or_final_version</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1620/tjem.181.109</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>9149345</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-0030632749</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>24215</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030632749&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>181</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>1</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>109</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>116</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:A1997WP06600013</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>Japan</publisher.place>
<bitstream.url>http://hub.hku.hk/bitstream/10722/49316/1/24215.htm</bitstream.url>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong