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Article: Characterizations and comparisons of eupnoea and gasping in neonatal rats

TitleCharacterizations and comparisons of eupnoea and gasping in neonatal rats
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-3751
Citation
Journal Of Physiology, 1996, v. 490 n. 1, p. 277-292 How to Cite?
Abstract1. Our purpose was to characterize the ventilatory patterns of eupnoea and gasping in the neonatal rat. This study was precipitated by reports, using in vitro brainstem spinal cord preparations, that only a single pattern is present in neonatal rats. 2. In anaesthetized or decerebrate rat pups aged less than 13 days, eupnoea was characterized by a sudden onset of inspiratory activity and then a more gradual rise to peak levels. Following vagotomy, frequency fell and peak phrenic activity and tidal volume increased. The rate of rise of inspiratory activity also rose, but peak levels were still achieved during the latter half of inspiration. Vagal efferent activity exhibited bursts during both inspiration and the early expiration. This basic eupnoeic rhythm was not altered after sectioning of the carotid sinus nerves. 3. Upon exposure to hypoxia or anoxia, phrenic activity, tidal volume and frequency initially increased and then declined. In many animals, ventilatory activity then ceased, but later returned with a gasping pattern. 4. Gasping was characterized by a sudden onset of phrenic activity, which reached a peak intensity during the early portion of inspiration. The expiratory burst of vagal activity was eliminated. 5. Reductions of body temperature from 37 to 27°C resulted in prolongations of inspiration and expiration and decreases of phrenic amplitude; phasic phrenic activity completely disappeared in some animals. Upon exposure to anoxia, gasping was observed, even in animals in which phrenic activity had disappeared in hyperoxia. 6. We conclude that, from the day of birth, rats can exhibit eupnoea and gasping patterns which are very similar to those of adult animals. 7. The rhythmic neural activities of the in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparation, reported by others, differ markedly from eupnoea but are identical with gasping. We therefore conclude that this preparation is not suitable for investigation of the mechanisms that generate eupnoeic breathing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49292
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.731
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.670
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, MLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDarnall, RAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSt John, WMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:38:41Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:38:41Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Physiology, 1996, v. 490 n. 1, p. 277-292en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-3751en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49292-
dc.description.abstract1. Our purpose was to characterize the ventilatory patterns of eupnoea and gasping in the neonatal rat. This study was precipitated by reports, using in vitro brainstem spinal cord preparations, that only a single pattern is present in neonatal rats. 2. In anaesthetized or decerebrate rat pups aged less than 13 days, eupnoea was characterized by a sudden onset of inspiratory activity and then a more gradual rise to peak levels. Following vagotomy, frequency fell and peak phrenic activity and tidal volume increased. The rate of rise of inspiratory activity also rose, but peak levels were still achieved during the latter half of inspiration. Vagal efferent activity exhibited bursts during both inspiration and the early expiration. This basic eupnoeic rhythm was not altered after sectioning of the carotid sinus nerves. 3. Upon exposure to hypoxia or anoxia, phrenic activity, tidal volume and frequency initially increased and then declined. In many animals, ventilatory activity then ceased, but later returned with a gasping pattern. 4. Gasping was characterized by a sudden onset of phrenic activity, which reached a peak intensity during the early portion of inspiration. The expiratory burst of vagal activity was eliminated. 5. Reductions of body temperature from 37 to 27°C resulted in prolongations of inspiration and expiration and decreases of phrenic amplitude; phasic phrenic activity completely disappeared in some animals. Upon exposure to anoxia, gasping was observed, even in animals in which phrenic activity had disappeared in hyperoxia. 6. We conclude that, from the day of birth, rats can exhibit eupnoea and gasping patterns which are very similar to those of adult animals. 7. The rhythmic neural activities of the in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparation, reported by others, differ markedly from eupnoea but are identical with gasping. We therefore conclude that this preparation is not suitable for investigation of the mechanisms that generate eupnoeic breathing.en_HK
dc.format.extent418 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-3751en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Physiologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe Journal of Physiology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Newborn - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRespiration - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshVagus Nerve - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnoxia - physiopathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Temperature - physiologyen_HK
dc.titleCharacterizations and comparisons of eupnoea and gasping in neonatal ratsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-3751&volume=490&issue=Pt 1&spage=277&epage=292&date=1996&atitle=Characterizations+and+comparisons+of+eupnoea+and+gasping+in+neonatal+ratsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFung, ML: fungml@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFung, ML=rp00433en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid8745295-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1158664-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029671007en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros26242-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0029671007&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume490en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage277en_HK
dc.identifier.epage292en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996TP72300021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, W=7501756233en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, ML=7101955092en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDarnall, RA=7003629071en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSt John, WM=36831054200en_HK

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